Partial PEX Install

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Old 11-05-13, 10:58 AM
S
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Partial PEX Install

Hello,

I'm attempting my first bathroom renovation and I thought I would try to use PEX. The home is currently on galvanized steel pipe, which will eventually all need to be replaced, but I'm not quite ready to take that on yet. As a result, I'm planning to use sub, or "remote" manifolds for the hot and cold lines going into the bathroom, which can be connected to larger PEX system later. I'm running into two problems. 1) I need to figure out where to mount the manifolds. My original thought was to mount them on the joists in the crawl space, but I don't know if this is a good idea or will meet code. It would certainly be the easiest thing, as there is no good place to put a service panel. Can the manifolds be mounted in the crawl space? 2) There is a ground wire on the current cold water supply for the sink. What do I do with this wire once the supply is moved to PEX? Can I attach it instead to the iron vent stack?

Thanks all for you help!!!
 
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Old 11-05-13, 04:21 PM
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Personally, I'm not much of a fan of manifolds. I'd rather use PEX similar to the traditional copper layout... 3/4" trunks split off to 1/2" fixtures, and 1/4-turn ball valves at each fixture. I find it easier and more streamlined.

But if you do decide to go the manifold route, I see no reason it can't be in the crawlspace. If you have a big leak at some point, you'll probably be diving for the main shutoff anyway, and can use the crawlspace shutoffs when needed. I'd find it sort of a pain to get into the crawl space any time you need to replace a fixture or washer... but then again, that really shouldn't be happening much.

As for the ground wire, do you know what's connected to the other end? If it's your electrical service panel, you'll have more work ahead of you. Maybe it's just am (illegal) ground for the receptacle in the bathroom? That'll have to be fixed too...
 
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Old 11-06-13, 09:11 AM
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Thank you for the feedback! I did go back and forth a bit on a traditional branch system vs a manifold. In the end I went with the manifold because it will involves fewer connections and thus fewer potential leaks, but we'll see how this works out.

For the ground, I need to get up in the attic to verify, but the ground is coming out of the ceiling, attaching to the only electrical outlet box in the room, then to the cold water supply. I have a pretty small house, so I would surprised if this didn't run all the way back to the panel.
 
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Old 11-06-13, 09:55 AM
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I think you'll be fine with the manifold setup, like I said, it's mostly preference.

I doubt it's your main panel ground, but if it is, be careful with it. While there shouldn't be any current flowing through it, there are occasionally cases where there can be, so you'd want to be sure you have a correct ground/bond with your water service before disconnecting that one.

It's been a code requirement for a long time to have the main water pipe grounded/bonded to the electrical panel within 5' of where the water main enters the house. I've seen those grounds in fuse panels from the '60s.

But do some tracing and see where it goes.
 
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Old 11-06-13, 12:25 PM
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They grounded to galvanized? I didn't think you could do that?
If its copper going out to the street which makes more sense (or brass) why not start your pex there and then leave the ground attached?
Will your manifolds have auto detection shutoff?
I was thinking of installing a few of those auto ones in my rentals and personal house in case of a bad scenario.
Ive been using pex now a bit and LOVE it. after fittings its a gamble whether its cheaper or more expensive than copper but man the EASE. Im cheap and paranoid though so I make as few fittings as possible and always try to be sure all my connections are in exposed areas.

Plus I think the insurance company would prob like it.
 
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