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Water shut-off valves for a stackable washer/dryer in a tight fitting area?

Water shut-off valves for a stackable washer/dryer in a tight fitting area?

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  #1  
Old 11-27-13, 06:38 AM
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Water shut-off valves for a stackable washer/dryer in a tight fitting area?

I have a little design dilemma. I am putting a stackable washer and dryer in a tight fitting closet. Anyone here with some experience with this? Where do you put the water shut-off valves?
 
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Old 11-27-13, 07:13 AM
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We have no picture so we'll have to guess.
Is this an outside wall?
The water lines are not the problem it's the drain line and vent that may be an issue.
How close is this to any drain lines?
I put mine on a side wall at the height just above the lid of the washer so I could shut off the water without moving the whole unit.
 
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Old 11-27-13, 07:29 AM
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Well, I'd like to have a full-sized front loading washer and dryer stacked in a space about the size of a closet. Depth isn't an issue as there is plenty of room front to back. And the back wall is an exterior wall so I can vent the dryer out the back easily.

About the width... I do want to put the water shut-off valves on the side of the washer so in the event of a water emergency I can turn off the water quickly. I am trying to figure out how much clearance on the width I need to fit a full-sized washer and dryer with adequate clearance for accessing the water-shut off valves. Right now, I am setting some plumbing lines and moving a wall to gain some width would be easy.
 
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Old 11-27-13, 08:23 AM
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If you have the width, and plan on staying stackable, offset the valve/drain box to one side, in the next stud bay. Exterior wall scares me if temps get very low. If you can gain as little as 8" or so on one side, move the box to the side wall(interior), and slide the w/d away from it, so you can access it with your hands.

I'm sure you have the drain vent figured in already.
 
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Old 11-29-13, 04:19 PM
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Thanks Chandler. I think if I could get as much as 8" clearance on the widths of the closet area I would. Here is the thing though. The width of the washer and dryer is 27". And I have exactly 28 1/2" of space not including drywall. I don't have the drywall up at the moment so things are changeable, but I'd rather not have to reframe a wall if I don't have to.

What is the minimum do you guys think I could get away with as far as width of the closet to fit a front loading stackable washer and dryer?
 
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Old 11-29-13, 04:53 PM
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Think about one thing, too. You have wall to wall measurements. Don't forget you have door returns, too, so you have to be able to get the washer/dryer in the room in the first place, so you are really limited. I'd say you need at least 34" of width so you can have wall returns (even if you don't have a door), and allow for flexibility on supply/drain/electric positioning.
 
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Old 11-29-13, 06:21 PM
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hi tonic-

I put in a stackable for my Mother years ago, but I guess her closet was wider than yours. Looking in the closet it was the dryer left and washer right, with the dryer venting through the closet side wall. The back and one side were outside walls.

I replaced the dryer with a stationary tub, and stacked a washer/dryer on the right, and had the washer empty into the stationary tub. If I remember the shutoffs for the washer were on the copper pipes on the back wall between the washer and dryer and thus did not have to be moved.

Guess that doesnít help you much, but one thing I would like to say is that there was one thing I didnít like about the stackable. They worked great but when the washer was on fast spin the dryer up on top seemed to shake back and forth a little too much for my liking. I checked and double checked to make sure I did the stacking properly, floor was level, etc. I couldnít find anything I did wrong.

I was going to try and come up with some kind of brace to hold that dryer from shaking so much but other events precluded that. And it wasnít that the washer load was unbalanced either causing a shake on the spin. It just seemed like that shaking of the dryer might be an inherent part of the stackable?

Maybe it was my installation, I never found out. Maybe other folks would know if that is a problem or not with the stackable.

Good luck with your project!
 
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Old 11-29-13, 09:32 PM
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Well, I won't have the problems with the door returns and stuff. There actually won't be a door there even though the space is about the size of a closet.

Chandler, so the size you suggest for the width of the closet (34"), is that for the width of the closet space without drywall or with drywall? I currently have about a closet width of 28 1/2" width for a stackable washer/dryer that is width of 27".

OK, I am really not wanting to do any extra re-framing of the 2x4s for making the closet wider, but I suppose I can. If I change my mind and just put the recessed box for the water lines behind the washer/dryer instead of on the side wall, can I get by with a narrower closet width? So for my 27" washer/dryer instead of having a closet width of about 34", could I get by with a smaller closet width if I put the water lines behind the washer?
 
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Old 11-30-13, 03:50 AM
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Sure, but you will lose the ability of controlling the water flow to the washing machine (turning it on and off when you use it), and you will have to pull the entire stack to do anything back there, but it is done every day. I just don't like occluding the control panel. As long as you think the 27" gives you enough wiggle room then you're fine.
 
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Old 11-30-13, 10:34 AM
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chandler I know you know more about this stuff than I do. But I thought it was highly discouraged to NOT turn off your water supply to a washing machine when itís not in use. I thought it had something to do with the fact that the supply lines are not meant to be under constant pressure as is the rest of the piping, and you are asking for trouble if you leave the water supply on all of the time?
 
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Old 11-30-13, 11:20 AM
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...The width of the washer and dryer is 27". And I have exactly 28 1/2" of space not including drywall...
I'm pretty sure you are supposed to have a least an inch clearance on all sides. But maybe that's close enough?
 
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Old 12-01-13, 10:23 AM
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Donít know what you guys think but this looks like a pretty good solution for anyone concerned about the washer supply lines. Looks pretty easy to install and I think they are only about $150. Seems like that would take care of any concerns. If there is room behind the unit, which there seems to be in this case, seems like that would be a great addition. IMHO anyway lol.

Seems like you could just turn on the water, push the units back into the closet, and not worry. Iíd get one myself but my washer/dryer is in an unfinished basement near a floor drain.lol


How to Install a Laundry Shut-Off Valve | Video | This Old House
 
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Old 12-02-13, 10:03 AM
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But I thought it was highly discouraged to NOT turn off your water supply to a washing machine when itís not in use.
The best answer is to turn off the water to your washer, then start the washer momentarily to relieve pressure in the hoses. When you turn off the valve AND the washer is off (its valves are closed), you maintain the same ~60psi of pressure in the hoses, which can lead to premature failure.

Of course, this is sort of a time-consuming process, so most people just recommend turning off the valves when it's not in use. That way even if a hose does burst, you only have the hose-worth of water leakage instead of tens or hundreds of gallons.
 
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Old 12-02-13, 12:07 PM
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Yeah, but does anybody actually turn off the water shut-off valves to their washer every time they aren't using the washer? I know that I don't, and I suspect that most people don't either. I put in a load of dirty clothes in the washer, and turn on the washer. When the cycle is done, I transfer the clothes from the washer to the dryer.

I've never turned off the water to the washer between uses. Who does that?
 
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Old 12-02-13, 06:40 PM
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tonic
Yeah, but does anybody actually turn off the water shut-off valves to their washer every time they aren't using the washer?...

Good question. I never used to do it, but when I moved in with my Mother for a while she was absolutely adamant about turning them off reminding me to check and double check. Never did ask her why, but maybe at one time she experienced a big problem? Donít know.

So now I am in the habit. Would be very interesting to see some statistical data.

I know that when I lived in a condo the association had a problem with so many hoses bursting that they forced everyone to upgrade their hoses, or else pay for any water damage should a flood occur. So I guess most of the people were never in the habit of turning off the supply.
 
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