Standard height for gas outlet for stove?

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Old 12-21-13, 04:21 PM
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Standard height for gas outlet for stove?

What is a good height to stub out a gas outlet for connecting to a stove/range?
 
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Old 12-21-13, 04:25 PM
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Depends on the stove and if you want to push it back against the wall...

Coming up through floor or wall?

6" IMO
 
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Old 12-21-13, 06:05 PM
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Thanks. It's coming up through the studs behind the drywall. Yes, I want to be able to push the stove all the way back against the wall if possible.
 
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Old 12-21-13, 06:12 PM
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What is the stove make and model?

Look up the specs. Coming out of the wall you need to elbow right away... There is always a cavity behind the stove for the gas valve...

Some stoves give more room then others...

All on right side from what I know....
 
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Old 12-22-13, 07:06 AM
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Definitely check the stove installation manual first. They all vary, and like Mike said, some have more clearance than others. You don't want to have to install it twice!
 
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Old 12-22-13, 01:26 PM
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Thanks guys. Well, I haven't decided yet what type stove to get so I think I'm just gonna stub it out at 6" and hope for the best.
 
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Old 12-22-13, 01:40 PM
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example page 4 here... Looks like a 15x23" opening... This is my stove more or less....

http://manuals.frigidaire.com/prodin.../316259343.pdf
 
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Old 12-22-13, 02:04 PM
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I haven't decided yet what type stove to get so I think I'm just gonna stub it out at 6" and hope for the best.
Where are you planning to install the drip leg for this line?
 
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Old 12-24-13, 12:08 PM
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I don't know if I want to install a drip leg. If I'm not mistaken it's not required for stoves anyway.
 
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Old 12-26-13, 11:22 AM
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hi tonic-

This is a very confusing area IMHO. LOL

I moved my Mother’s dryer years ago and never even thought about this until after the fact. Just thought about it recently and found the info below, which I believe is correct. (Maybe Lawrosa has the straight scoop.)

(“dirt leg” = “sediment trap”) DOES NOT EQUAL (“drip leg”).

A “drip leg” is used when “wet gas” is being used to collect potential condensation. (Whatever “wet gas” means? I think it means gas known to have hydrocarbon gases and, in some cases, liquids.? ) But it seems like “wet gas” usage is not common so “drip legs” are not normally required? (That could be wrong.)

A “sediment trap” is supposed to be used for gas appliances to collect crap in the gas that may cause problems with the appliance. But stoves and gas dryers and some other things are exempt – I’m pretty sure that’s correct. (I had a copy of the relevant (or one of the relevant) code sections but can’t find it. LOL)

I guess you could always ask the inspector (I didn’t, maybe not good) about the “drip leg” thingy, but I bet the “drip leg” wouldn’t be required either.
 
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Old 12-26-13, 12:01 PM
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A vertical pipe with downward gas flow needs a drip leg/sediment trap at the point of use. A vertical pipe with upward gas flow does not need the drip leg/sediment trap at the point of use. Any time the piping goes vertical with an upward gas flow the transition from horizontal to vertical should be made with a tee and then a drip leg/sediment trap (six inch capped nipple) at the lowest point. This latter provision is rarely done.
 
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Old 12-28-13, 08:09 AM
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Thanks Furd. I have my incoming gas for the stove coming in via a vertical pipe in a downward flow. I am limited by space and it would require some reframing of wall studs to be able to accommodate any type of tee fitting and drip leg/sediment trap. Even though my gas for the stove is coming from above, I don't think code requires a drip leg/sediment trap for the stove. Correct?
 
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Old 12-28-13, 03:38 PM
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I have no idea what your LOCAL code (the only code that matters) may say about the use of drip legs or sediment traps. If you want to check the national code then try a Google using National Fuel Gas Code for the search term. You may need to register to view the code and you most likely will not be able to copy from the code.

Or, just call your local code enforcement office and ask the inspector. Early mornings are usually best as afternoons are when the field inspections are made.
 
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