Copper pipe too short to replace angle valve

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Old 12-22-13, 05:58 AM
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Copper pipe too short to replace angle valve

I am replacing an angle valve that was leaking and the copper stubout is too short to replace the angle valve without it partially being in the wall. I have the wall open so I have access to the pipe.

Here is a picture of the copper line (i just put a cap on it for the time being).
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The pipe is right next to a stud and I don't know that I am comfortable soldering right there. Is my best option to cut the pipe in the wall add a coupling and extend the pipe out further?
 
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Old 12-22-13, 06:07 AM
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I think I would loosen the clamp that's right behind there so that you can pull the pipe out farther. You could also use a compression shutoff, and eliminate the torch. Although I agree sweating your connections is best. After you're done, replace the clamp so the shutoff stays tight to the wall.
 
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Old 12-22-13, 06:22 AM
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Exactly what XSleeper said. Most pipes will have a bit of play. Use a screwdriver or something metallic to temporarily hold it away from the wall while you add a coupler and an inch of additional pipe and a new shutoff.

Be sure to thoroughly clean and flux the pipe. If it's clean, you should have no problem soldering it.

As long as you're replacing it, be sure to use a 1/4-turn angle stop. Much better and longer lasting than the multi-turn ones.
 
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Old 12-22-13, 06:40 AM
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You might also want to plan for a repair escutcheon behind the shutoff, so consider that when you are deciding the exact spot the shutoff (and clamp) need to go. The repair escutcheon would go on last after the drywall was repaired and painted.
 
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Old 12-22-13, 06:46 AM
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They sell insulating pads that you can shove between the pipe and studd so you don't set the stud on fire. Easily found at the local big box.
 
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Old 12-22-13, 06:52 AM
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Thanks for the replies. Sounds like a coupler with an inch of extra pipe is the best way to go.

Just out of curiosity is there any reason I shouldn't use a sharkbite coupling and avoid the torch altogether?
 
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