Saddle Valve Clogged

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Old 01-11-14, 11:38 AM
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Saddle Valve Clogged

I have a saddle valve that runs water to my furnace humidifier and it seems to be clogged. I have removed the valve from the housing and stuck a thin wire in to unclog it, but it didn't work. The valve had been closed for a couple of years.
Any suggestions please?
 
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Old 01-11-14, 12:44 PM
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Try screwing the knob in all the way and then backing it out. If that does not work I would remove the saddle valve and install a T and ball type shutoff valve.

I have a personal hatred of saddle valves as the tiny hole they open in the water line can easily clog and are a potential leak source.
 
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Old 01-11-14, 02:29 PM
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Get rid of it.
There not even legal to use in some places.
There going to leak or plug up.
 
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Old 01-11-14, 05:47 PM
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I've backed the knob all of the way out and all the way back in a couple of times, but it did no good. Installing a T and ball type shutoff valve will require a plumber and I'd hate to have to call one in just for that if I can come up with a fix I can do.
 
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Old 01-11-14, 07:16 PM
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If you're willing to do some plumbing, using a SharkBite slip tee, you can cut the saddle valve out, and slide the new Tee in place. Then add a short piece of pipe on the tee to a compression 1/4-turn valve, which would then connect to the furnace humidifier.

It'll take 30-45 minutes if you've never done it before (or would probably take a pro 10 minutes).
 
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Old 01-13-14, 03:27 AM
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Thanks Zorfdt. I took a look at the SharkBite webiste and your idea looks very doable. My only concern is being able to fit the tee between the pipes after it is cut to the right size to fit the tee. I won't be able to lift the supply pipe up to fit the tee because it butts against the joist and I won't be able to lower the bottom half because it goes into the water heater.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 04:39 AM
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Posting a picture so we can see what your up against may help.
Sometimes just removing the valve and drilling out the hole works.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 07:21 AM
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I would NOT drill out the hole in a saddle valve. Doing so will probably insure that the valve can never be closed.

The hole in the pipe is made by the saddle valve by turning the knob. The tip of the threaded shaft is pointed and pierces the pipe. When you back the knob out the point is removed from the hole allowing water to flow. Screwing the knob in pushes the pointed part back into the hole closing the valve. Drilling out the hole means it is too big for the pointed tip to plug and the valve can never be closed or turned off.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 04:34 PM
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Before I posted my problem on this website, I did a Google search on saddle valves. Apparently there are two types. One is as described by Pilot Dane, where the knob is pointed and puts the hole in the supply pipe. The other requires a hole to be drilled which I believe mine is. When I removed the knob, I noticed the rod tapered down to a flat end. and it didn't appear as though anything had broken off as the flat tip was smooth. So I have to think that I have the second type.

I like the joecaption's idea of removing the whole assembly and unclogging the hole, but I get the impression from what I have read that it must be very difficult to line it back up properly. Although it seems to me I could remove the whole assembly, unclog the hole, stick a tooth pick in it to line up the saddle valve properly, remove the toothpick and reinsert the rod. Does that sound plausible?

Before I forget, I appreciate all the responses with suggestions. Thank you.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 04:42 PM
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IMO your best bet is to remove the saddle valve, ( not to code anymore AFAIK), and install a regular valve.
 
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