Proposal for French Drain around House

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-12-14, 02:35 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Proposal for French Drain around House

I been in my house 3 years and our sump pump runs way too often. With the recent snow/rain (about 2 inches total), its been running every 15-20 seconds for the past 48 hours. I am on my 3rd pump in 3 years.

I had a basement guy/excavator come out and give me a proposal to help stop the water from entering my basement. He is proposing to dig a 10 foot deep perimeter french drain and try to get below the weeping tile around the house foundation. Then he would drain to gravity so it would avoid the sump pit. This would also help deal with any water table issues.

The guy wants 8-10k, but I am not sure it will work or not.

I am also going to redo all of the downspouts this spring as well to direct the water from the house. Not sure what the previous owner did, but a couple of the underground drains are clogged/rooted.

Please excuse my poor drawing skills.... The big arrows show the slope of the land.
 
Attached Images  
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-12-14, 03:38 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Did he say anything about sealing the foundation? For that much money, I would want the entire package. How high is the water table? How is the pitch?
 
  #3  
Old 01-12-14, 05:11 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I've never checked the water table and this guy didn't either. His solution was to just dig low enough to deal with any kind of water table issues above the bottom of the basement. Just a big circle around and away from the house (not at foundation).

The pitch would work fine for a gravity drain. There is currently slope towards the house that brings lots of water.
 
  #4  
Old 01-12-14, 05:26 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Correcting the slope might be all that's needed. Is the water entering on all sides of the house or just where the slope is wrong? Why is work needed on all sides, if only one or two are the problem? I was just part of a crew but we did a lot of waterproofing. My boss charged $120 per linear foot, at the time. That included digging to the footing, sealing the foundation with a membrane & correcting the pitch when we back filled. I'd seal your foundation for half that price, if I were in your neighborhood.
 
  #5  
Old 01-12-14, 05:44 PM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,144
Received 85 Votes on 80 Posts
I would suggest running 2 pipes in the excavated trench. One perforated to handle the french drain and one solid just for the downspouts. That way the downspout water has no way of getting to your foundation at all. Run them both separately down the hill and to clear air so you can snake it in the future or confirm you're getting good water flow in a rain storm.

Looking at the slope towards the house on the front of the house, you may be able to resolve much of your issue by adding the drains only to the front of your house.

One last thing... I would probably try diverting the gutters 8-10" away from the house with a simple pipe or downspout. Even if it's temporary, it may resolve much of your issue. It would be a cheaper solution if it works. If it doesn't, then try the french drain route.
 
  #6  
Old 01-12-14, 07:56 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Pulpo, the water is entering my basement as expected through the weeping tile. Its not entering through any kind of leak (that I know of)...

I would like the water to not enter the weeping tile system so I don't have to pump it out of the basement all the time.

***

When it gets warmer later this week I might try to put new downspout extensions on and see if that helps.
 
  #7  
Old 01-12-14, 08:43 PM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Without knowing the level of water in your nearby creek, there is a possibility that the local water level around your house is near the basement floor elevation. You have about 80,000 sf (2 acres)of ground sloping toward your home and then diverted around and toward the creek.

Without any real details the best suggestion is to get the downspouts to a reasonably effective length (6') and never, ever connect the drain tile to a downspout.

How is the water getting into the basement since the exterior drain tile is not really connected to the basement area unless it overflows a sump or is due to a local leakage through the slab.

If you have existing landscaping in addition to the existing garage driveway and sidewalks, a good interior drain tile in the basement could be an option, since it wall also reduce the hydrostatic pressure upward and inward and create a dryer soil reservoir for the short term and seasonal changes. - Just a guess.

Dick
 
  #8  
Old 01-15-14, 12:41 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
In the sump pit, I have 3 x 4inch ABS pipes dumping water. 2 of them almost always drop water in and the 3rd rarely does (only drops when we have a downpour).

Ours is the only house in the neighborhood (7 houses) without a walkout basement and the house sets 2 or 3 feet above ground. Perhaps there is a high water table where the house is sitting.

The downspouts are #1 on the spring priority list. The previous owner buried them and I *hope* he was smart enough not to connect to the drain tile.

I have the sump pump water running to air above ground (25 ft away) so I can prove its not recycling back into the pump.
 
  #9  
Old 01-15-14, 06:40 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Dig outside in line with the pipes that usually dump the water until you hit water. It's not as hard has it sounds. Use a post hold digger (PhD) for the first 4 feet. For $10, you can rent a tool that looks like a post hold digger but it twists with a T Bar. You spin it 3 times & pull up the dirt that it grabs. It comes with an extension but I have a feeling that you won't need it. Once you see where the water table is, you'll know what to do. I had two jobs to find the water table. They were 2 of the easiest jobs I've ever had.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: