moving washer to basement with a horizontal sewer line

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Old 01-19-14, 10:58 AM
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moving washer to basement with a horizontal sewer line

Hey guys,
I'm hoping someone can help me out. It's probably relatively simple I just dont know enough about plumbing/sewer lines.

Currently my washer and dryer are in my kitchen, so my wife would really like to get them out of the way, so she wants me to put them in the basement.

My sewer line is horizontal, but on the end there is a plug. Can I remove the plug and put something(pvc) there so that I can drain the washing machine into the end of this drain line?

The sewer line is a little less than 5 ft off the ground. Will a washing machine be able to push the water up to this height? Its a front loading bosch compact washer if that helps at all.

Bottom line is; is this doable and how easy would it be to do it, if it is?



 
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Old 01-19-14, 11:02 AM
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Actually if you look in the first picture on the right you'll see a white PVC pipe up in the corner coming down into the sewer line. That is the drain for the washing machine currently. The washer and dryer are sitting right above that in the kitchen. I dont know if this helps any, but I figured I'd add it.
 
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Old 01-19-14, 01:03 PM
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Check the specs for your washing machine. The manufacturer probably specifies the maximum discharge height. I have seen some with ridiculously high discharges so it can work. Probably not recommended but they did seem to work.

If you decide to tie your washer into the clean out in the basement I would preserve the clean out as it could be very handy if your main sewer line ever clogs. It would just be moved over a foot or two to make room for the new fittings. Make sure to use 2" line for the washer and include a trap. Another option though not approved in some areas is to discharge the washing machine into a sump where a pump pumps the water up to the sewer line.
 
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Old 01-19-14, 01:52 PM
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If going the sump route, you may want to have the washer drain into a slop sink for added capacity in case the pump goes down during a load of laundry.
 
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Old 01-19-14, 02:43 PM
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thank you pilot dane and drooplug.
I dont have a sump pump in my basement....My house is pretty much on the peak of a hill in all direction....so flooding/water in the basement, I guess arent a concern....I do have a dry pit on the other end of the basement so thats really of no help to me.

So if I move the clean out plug over a foot, what fitting should I use right there? Is that where I'd need to use a wye, or a sewer T(I think thats what there called?) Or will a standard PVC T work fine?

Then I guess my next question would be, would I have to vent this up to the roof?
Or am I way over thinking this?
Lastly Ive read about needing a 36" 2" pipe for the washing hose to drain into, is this necessary as well? If so that would put me up through the ceiling and not able to use the cleanout....
 
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Old 01-20-14, 06:23 AM
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Regardless whether you just use a standpipe or a sink/pump combination, you would extend your existing (it looks like) 3" pipe off to the left with a male screw-in fitting, a short piece of 3" PVC" and a 3x3x2 Wye. On the left side of the fitting, you'd install a new cleanout plug.

The 2" fitting would then connect to a 2" P-trap and vertical standpipe that the washer drains into, or downsize to a 1" PVC that the laundry pump would drain into.

I personally like the laundry tub solution best. It will cost a bit more, but you get a slop sink out of the deal which is always nice to have in the basement.
 
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Old 01-20-14, 09:20 AM
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Lastly I've read about needing a 36" 2" pipe for the washing hose to drain into....that would put me up through the ceiling...
I'm quite sure that means 36" above the floor so you don't have any siphon action going on, you'll be way above that.
 
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Old 01-26-14, 11:53 AM
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Thanks for the help guys....everything went smooth.

But just curious, if I wanted to add the slop sink, what kind of pump would I use to pump from the drain to the sewer line?
 
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Old 01-26-14, 03:17 PM
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Unfortunately you cant do what you did and its not to code... You have no vent... I also would not want to be in the basement when you have a main line clog either...

The right way was to install a laundry sink.. Use a pump like this..

Liberty Pumps : Drain Pumps

It allows you to vent the tank... The washer drains in the sink and the sink pump s to the sewer...

Additionally its hard piped to the sewer line, but must be installed with a WYE rolled up on a 45... A backwater valve needs to be installed also...

Most likely with that set up your sucking the trap dry and deadly sewer gas is being released in the home......
 
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Old 01-26-14, 05:02 PM
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So the advice I was given was incorrect?
I actually asked about a vent....but didnt hear anything about it so I assumed it wasnt needed.

I cant use this compact washer anyways....the pump isnt powerful enough to pump the water up to that height. I actually ordered a new full size washer and dryer to replace these so it'll be a few days before I get those, and for the meantime this setup is not being used. I have been making sure the trap is full of water though.

So what exactly should I do to fix the situation?
 
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Old 01-26-14, 05:26 PM
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So the advice I was given was incorrect?
I actually asked about a vent....but didnt hear anything about it so I assumed it wasnt needed.
Well sorry I missed this one... Its been busy on the forum with the cold snap and such...

Briefed through the thread and not sure of the others plumbing experience with whats code or not...

But you took no time getting the job done... he he..

I actually ordered a new full size washer and dryer to replace these
Why!!! If you do as I stated its not needed...

Sometimes you need to be patient with things..


So what exactly should I do to fix the situation?
Just what I stated in post #9..
 
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Old 01-26-14, 05:37 PM
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You need to install a laundry sink with a pump... Like the liberty link I posted... Here is a pic with a different pump... This is how I do mine as I put the pump to the side...

One line from the pump is a vent... Just a studor vent on top 3 ft above the sink.. The other line gets tied into the sewer...

Check valve is needed on discharge line... As well as a backwater valve, ( I will try to find a pic)

The washer then discharges into the sink....


 
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Old 01-26-14, 06:44 PM
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Unfortunately you cant do what you did and its not to code... You have no vent... I also would not want to be in the basement when you have a main line clog either...
All you need is the vent. Maybe a studor vent would be ok?

A main line clog would be a problem in any basement that had an open drain. A laundry sink would be the same problem. You can install a check valve if you are that concerned about it.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 01:16 PM
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Thanks a lot for the info lawrosa and drooplug.

The purchase of the new machines was not just because of this LOL.
My wife has wanted FULL SIZE machines since we bought the house and the compact units were in the kitchen. She wanted larger ones in the basement, so thats what we got. Once I realized I'd have to lift the compact units up to get it to pump the water, we said screw it and got the units we wanted.

As far as the work.....I'm an HVAC mechanic so the work is not foreign to me. BUT I dont know much about sewer plumbing(wastewater/drains, etc.). So that is why Im here! haha

Just out of curiosity.....could I add a studor vent between the trap and the 2" part of the T? This is if I continue using it the way I have it now.

In the future I WILL CERTAINLY add the utility sink and pump, but I'd rather hold off for a little....the new machines hurt a little lol
 
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