Basement entrance drain - Where does it go?

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Old 01-27-14, 12:13 PM
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Basement entrance drain - Where does it go?

OK - I'm hoping someone can enlighten me here as this question has generated conflicting answers, even amongst contractors whom I've asked.

This picture is NOT my house but one I grabbed to illustrate.

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When building an entrance such as this, of course you MUST install a drain such as the one pictured.

The house in question has sanitary drains inside and the perimeter weeping tile on the outside of the foundation. Pretty standard.

Should the drain at the bottom of these steps tie in and drain to the perimeter weep, or travel into the house below the basement slab and connect with a sanitary drain in the floor of the basement?

I can't imagine the code on this varies a great deal from one area to another but I suppose it would be interesting to know if it does.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 06:00 PM
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That type of drain is usually a dry well. It holds the water long enough, to disperse into the ground.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 07:39 PM
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I've never really heard of a dry well being used where there's city service like this. I'm quite certain it needs to tie into a drain.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 08:07 PM
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AFAIK, the city only takes rain water from storm drains in the street. Storm drains from the street nor from houses do not go into the sewer system.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 08:13 PM
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The weeping tile drains out to the storm drain.

The sanitary drain in the house drains into the sanitary drain system.

Both are separate and managed as a municipal utility once off the property.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 08:40 PM
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Looking a bit more closely, I just realized that you are in Canada. I know, duh on my part. Here in NY, it's just a dry well.
 
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Old 01-29-14, 03:23 AM
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I think , what I would call a French drain , is what you all are calling a dry well ?

God bless
Wyr
 
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Old 01-29-14, 06:58 AM
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A dry well looks like a big garbage can with a bunch of holes in it.
 
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Old 01-30-14, 01:24 AM
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Best I remember , a French drain is often fill with large , round gravel ? Allows the water to run down / threw & soak into the soil .

I see then , occasionally for places where a drain is needed & no sewer line is readily available .

Small ones , I have seen for condensate drains .

God bless
Wyr
 
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Old 02-02-14, 02:15 PM
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Hey Guys

In the last couple of days I've inquired with two master plumbers in the area.

One said that this is considered to be a floor drain even though its outside and hence needs to be tied into the sanitary system.

The other said that he himself has an entrance like this and his IS tied into the sanitary BUT this is only because lives out if town and his house is not tied into a municipal storm system. He added that in my situation the correct way to code would be to connect the drain to the storm drain(weeping time)

The one thing that they both agreed in was that any dry well or other ground dissipation system was not at all acceptable where there are municipal drainage systems

So I guess I'm back to try and interpret code unless anyone else has any insight?
 
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Old 02-02-14, 02:49 PM
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AFAIK, the local municipalities don't want to process rain water from private properties, no matter if it's a storm drain or a sewer system. I've installed a number of dry wells & never connected one to a storm drain or a sewer system.

FloWell - Storm Water Leaching System - YouTube

That's ^^ all you need.
 
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Old 02-02-14, 04:30 PM
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Not that I doubt you in any way. Just trying to make sense of how I could be getting three so vastly different opinions, all from experienced people...
 
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Old 02-02-14, 07:54 PM
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The difference could come from the fact that we live in 2 different countries. Why try to connect the drain to anything? Install the dry well & forget about it. No one is going to look at the job.
 
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