Finishing a rough-in basement bathroom: drains

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Old 02-06-14, 10:25 PM
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Finishing a rough-in basement bathroom: drains

Trying to get some similar advice...

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pl...om-drains.html


I'm finishing a basement with a 3/4 bathroom. The drains were roughed in by the builder ~1986. I'm trying to do this without having to move drains (i.e jack hammering).

Lets also start with the drains. From right to left: shower, sink (1.5 inch PVC), toilet and maybe the toilet vent stack (2 inch PVC)?

The problem I foresee is that the drain for the sink needs to be left of the 2 inch vent stack. My plans are to frame directly in front of the PVC stacks and not right against the wall. Then, I would need to extend the sink drain through at least one stud and past (in front) the 2 inch vent stack. This would leave me with just under 11 inches for the toilet drain after drywall. So theoretically a 10 inch rough in toilet should fit?

Or, can I hook the sink drain to the 2 inch PVC and push my framing back as far as possible to avoid leaving too little room for the toilet. This is less ideal, because I've already put foam board in place and I'm framing off of the wall in the rest of the basement including the adjoining wall.

Thanks
 
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Last edited by lawrosa; 02-07-14 at 03:49 AM.
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Old 02-07-14, 02:45 AM
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Geb1222, welcome to the forums! Framing 1" from the concrete wall will allow proper clearances to the fixtures. You can run the sink drain around the vent stack and through your studs. You will want to maintain 12-13" clearance from the finished wall to the center of the toilet drain. 1" from wall, 3 1/2" stud, 1/2" sheetrock = 5". You have 18", so that gives you the 13" necessary.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 03:49 AM
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Geb welcome,,,,

1. do those two vents tie together above somewhere?
2. Does anything drain into the 2" vent stack as you describe?


You can probably terminate that sink arm and use the 2" vent but I need to know the above.....
 
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Old 02-07-14, 11:42 AM
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Thanks for the replies.

I'd prefer to frame off the wall a bit more, because I already have foamboard in place and my adjoining wall is already framed. I guess I just have to risk having to jackhammer if a 10 inch rough in toilet doesn't fit.

lawrosa

1. Not sure. The two stacks run up through the subfloor and behind the kitchen wall. It conceivable because the 1.5 inch stacks turns left under the joists and the two run up next to each other at the subfloor.

2. Just checked this and the kitchen sink drains into the 2 inch stack on the left.

Thanks
 
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Old 02-07-14, 12:19 PM
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Just checked this and the kitchen sink drains into the 2 inch stack on the left.
You cannot tie anything into this then... (2" stack on left)


You need to use the vent thats already stubbed for the sink...( The 1 1/2" one)
 
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Old 02-07-14, 06:12 PM
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Thanks Mike.

Since the drain for sink has to run left of the 2 inch stack, I think I'm stuck with framing in front of the stacks, or else the sink drain would protrude from the wall. I guess a 10 inch rough in toilet is my best bet, or perhaps an offset toilet flange. Any recommendations for an offset flange for drain in concrete?
 
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Old 02-07-14, 07:16 PM
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Dont use an offset flange IMO if you do not have to...

Just install a 10" rough toilet...

But you only have to box the wall out from about the 2" pipe and left... Toilet should be unaffected....
 
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Old 02-08-14, 08:17 PM
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Thanks for all the help. Earlier you mentioned I could not tap into the kitchen drain/vent (2 inch stack). Is this a code issue? Reason I'm asking is I have another drain in another area of the basement that I'm thinking about a future potential wet bar area. Its a 1.5" drain straight into the slab and I'm 99% sure the upstairs laundry drains into it. Could I wye off this for a small sink?
 
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Old 02-08-14, 10:20 PM
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You cant tie into anything with water running in it... It would be considered a wet vent and not to code...

The only way you could is if you run a branch vent. from say the wet bar. and tie that branch vent into the vent of the fixture above it. Which in this case would be the laundry..

Or get a vent to the attic...

Of course there are studor vents that may or may not be allowed in your area...

Or its possible for the bar sink is to run the vent for it over to the basement bath sink vent... Just need enough pitch...You can tie into that..
 
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Old 03-07-14, 07:20 PM
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So a month later and I've made some progress on the basement and bathroom, but I've run into a hiccup. I was attempting to move the shower drain a couple inches with a coupling when I noticed that the builder only dry-fit the entire trap assembly in the break-out box. When I pulled it apart it contained black soil looking substance and a few drain flies flew out. Not sure what the black stuff was, no odor, and basically turned into dust later in the day.

Would there be any reason to only dry-fit the shower rough in? This would seem to be against code to pass the initial inspection. I could glue everything back on and be done with it, but I'm worried about what I cant see. If they didnt glue this, who knows what is or isnt down the line. Any ideas, I dont want to have to break up concrete, but...
 
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Old 03-07-14, 07:38 PM
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Yes probably not glued so you can position the trap properly if needed. Meaning slight offset, cut back, extended..etc...

Hard trap? ( Meaning all glue and no nut like an LA trap?)
 
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Old 03-08-14, 03:19 AM
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Mike, thanks again, you are the man. Yeah just a hard trap, no nut. Here is a picture. Name:  IMG_20140228_205925.jpg
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I did feel a crack in the line that the trap is connected to, so I may have to chisel back further to cut it past the crack and get the coupling on. Unless there is another way to seal it (plastic weld?)
 
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Old 03-08-14, 04:01 AM
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No plastic weld.... Chisel back and repair properly. Cement is cheap..You will sleep better at night.
 
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