Help Me Decide How To Sweat These Pipes

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Old 02-17-14, 03:11 PM
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Help Me Decide How To Sweat These Pipes

The two vertical shutoff valves need to be replaced as the main house shutoff (lower) dripped once last time I turned the handle and the softener bypass valve is currently leaking what is equivalent to like one drop an hour (the water run like 8 inches down the copper before evaporating).

1. Thing is, I don't know how to separate the copper pipes as it appears to me that there is no room for them to move in order to pull out the old valves and install new ones.

2. The two pipes you see running to the side go to a water softener about 8 feet over and have ball valves installed halfway through in each one

3. I am concerned about having to solder so close to the drywall and potentially overheating whatever may be inside that wall through heat transfer through the copper.

4. the softener system was put in with K pipe and I accidentally melted through part of it when unsoldering to repipe for a new softener (MAPP gas)... what are some less risky heating methods as I do not know the type of pipe coming out of the wall.

5. Water main comes up through the floor and tube has about a 3-4 foot run vertically, can it be flexed in order to separate the pipes above it? What is that nut and how are those pipes joined?

6. There is additional water shutoff outside by the meter which I am slightly concerned about touching...

7. What would a seasoned plumber probably charge to do all of this?
 
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Last edited by jeremy_283; 02-17-14 at 03:32 PM.
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Old 02-17-14, 03:58 PM
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I am also considering utilizing a valve such as this as it appears to be easily repairable?

 
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Old 02-17-14, 04:05 PM
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I wouldn't worry about the heat transfer into the wall from the pipe. You can use a squirt bottle to squirt water in there to keep the heat down. If you need to solder next to a sheetrock wall you can use a heat pad to keep the wall from getting scorched.

Don't know much about those serviceable valves.
In the pic below is a union. It's a point where you break apart the pipes.

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Old 02-17-14, 04:11 PM
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In the photo you quoted do I just hold the bottom with a wrench and the top with a wrench and it unscrews and I basically have a gasket mashed between two plates?
 
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Old 02-17-14, 05:02 PM
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You can also use a hacksaw to cut the valves out and then unsolder what remains.
 
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Old 02-17-14, 05:36 PM
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When you write that the valve(s) leak do you mean an external drip from the handle area? If yes then remove the handle (one nut) and slightly tighten the packing nut into the body of the valve. Probably will only need one-eighth of a turn or so and then you replace the handle.
 
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Old 02-17-14, 06:04 PM
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No, it leaks from where the two cylindrical areas join together.
 
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Old 02-17-14, 06:22 PM
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Ah, most likely the valve body was overheated when they were soldered into place. This is why I dislike soldered valves and only use threaded valves with soldered thread adapters. If I were you I would simply cut out the valves and replace them with threaded valves, unions and adapters.
 
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Old 02-17-14, 06:35 PM
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Thanks, I will keep this in mind. Also, are unions reusable? such as the union pictured showing where the main water line connects to the shut off valve, will that be reusable or will I need to work on the main water line copper pipe?
 
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Old 02-17-14, 07:00 PM
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Yes, the unions are reusable.
 
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Old 02-18-14, 06:35 AM
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Old 02-18-14, 07:14 AM
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I agree with Furd. Solder on threaded adapters then go with threaded valves and unions. If you don't want to do the soldering bit then you could go with Sharkbites. But I prefer the solder and screw idea myself.
<input id="mac_address" value="" type="hidden">I agree with FURD,
 
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Old 02-19-14, 06:27 AM
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Will the valve side of this union fit just fine with the other pre-existing union on the main water line?

[ATTACH=CONFIG]26996[/ATTACH]
 
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Last edited by jeremy_283; 02-19-14 at 07:26 AM.
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Old 02-19-14, 05:17 PM
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Can someone identify if this is a gasket union or at least what type of mating surface it has?
 
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Old 02-20-14, 03:58 AM
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Metal to metal mating surface. Typical sweat connection.
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Old 03-03-14, 06:26 PM
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I got this done like a week ago. I researched and found the exact same brand of union being currently used so I used one half of the new union to mate to the old half. It worked well. These valves are so nice compared to every other valve I've ever seen. Bronze body, stainless steel stem, stainless steel ball, MPTFE seat, and MPTFE packing
 
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Last edited by jeremy_283; 03-03-14 at 06:52 PM.
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Old 03-04-14, 04:44 AM
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I recently roughed in for a new electric water heater , in a new location . I used valves with screw in fittings and a copper nipple soldered to the male adaptor . Screwed the malw adaptor into the valve and solder in the other end of the nipple .

Remember , wrap a rag wet with cold water , around temperature sensitive items . Like the valves and the heat trap nipples that come on new water heaters .

Be generous with flux . If you have a fitting that is giving you trouble , buy tinning flux at contains ground up solder , in the paste .

God bless
Wyr
 
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Old 03-04-14, 08:27 AM
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These valves are so nice compared to every other valve I've ever seen. Bronze body, stainless steel stem, stainless steel ball, MPTFE seat, and MPTFE packing

Just a newbie, but looks like the handle says Apollo. My understanding is that those are really high quality.That's what I used also.

p.s. looks really nice.
 
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