Replacing Main Shutoff (pic included)

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Old 02-21-14, 06:57 AM
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Replacing Main Shutoff (pic included)

Hello everyone,
After doing some plumbing work around the house my main shutoff is slightly leaking, wont close all the way, and the handle stripped off. I have the city coming out in the next 24 hrs to shut off the water at the curb so I can replace it with a 1/4 turn full port ball valve. I think I have all my bases covered and will proceed very carefully. I have attached a pic so everyone can see what I'm looking at. Is there anything I should be concerned about? Other than being careful not to damage the pipes trying to get the old valve off?


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Old 02-21-14, 08:37 AM
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Make sure you do not rotate or torque the copper pipe or the compression fitting on top of it so make sure you hold that fitting from rotating when you loosen the others.

When you loosen or remove the fittings expect to get wet. All the water in the pipes above will start to drain down, sometimes sporadically. Once you get the old valve off you can put a bucket under the pipe and have someone go through the house and open the faucets. This will quickly drain most of the water out of the lines.

Where is your water heater located? Does it have a shutoff valve? If it's upstairs and does not have a shutoff it's a good idea to turn it off when working and do NOT open and hot water faucets. You don't want to siphon water out of it.

Before starting the work fill several buckets with water. If you run into troubles and can't get the water turned back on quickly you can flush a toilet by quickly pouring a bucket of water into the bowl.

"keys" or tools for turning water on and off are available at most home centers and plumbing suppliers. You may find it helpful to be able to turn your water back on to check for leaks without having to wait for the city to do it for you. Down here in the south our meters and shutoff valves are very shallow so it can be done with basic hand tools. In Ohio I assume yours is buried deep enough to need the proper tool. If you don't want to buy one a plumber may let you borrow one for the weekend. They are rather inexpensive.

 
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Old 02-21-14, 08:46 AM
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Thank you for the reply. I actually have a 3 - way bypass just above (can't see it in the pic) from a water softner install I did. So I should be able to avoid water dripping down on me. Interesting thought on buying buying a key. I'm not sure where my shutoff is outside so when the water department shows up I'll ask them what size / kind of tool they use so I can turn it on myself to check for leaks. Hopefully they allow me to do that.
 
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Old 02-21-14, 10:32 AM
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In many areas it's in the ground right next to the dial on the meter.

 
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Old 02-25-14, 07:55 AM
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Name:  New Valve.jpg
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Size:  32.5 KBSo I got the new valve installed and had the water company turn the water back on. I used Rectorseal #5 and 3 wraps of teflon tape and o leaks.
 
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