How to Replumb a House?????

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Old 03-03-14, 09:52 AM
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How to Replumb a House?????

Hello Everybody! So my grandmother needs her whole house replumbed but doesn't have the funds. So as the only grandson I'm automatically volunteered. I have basic knowledge of plumbing. But I have no idea how to replumb a whole house. I know we will be running PVC/CPVC. She has a septic. I'm kindly of confused on certain things. Like how do I go from the main water supply to inside the house. Then what is the first thing I run to. What size piping should I use. What rooms do I do first. What about the water heater. I know I can do the the work I just don't have all the knowledge. So basically what I need is directions on how to replumb an entire house. I'm not sure if this has already been asked or not.
 
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Old 03-03-14, 10:11 AM
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Hello and welcome...

Being in florida you do not have a basement or crawl?

IMO your best off using pex pipe. Manifolds would be easy but I often run a trunk line down the center of the home and branch off from there..









 
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Old 03-03-14, 12:35 PM
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the reason I don't want to use PEX is because you need the crimping tool that is expensive and don't have and would only use once.
 
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Old 03-03-14, 01:25 PM
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The tool isn't that expensive (check ebay and Amazon)...and can easily be resold when you are done. The benefits and speed of installation of PEX far outweigh the relatively minor cost of the tool.

PVC and CPVC aren't flexible and are a lot more trouble to work with...esp when you are trying to maneuver them around in an attic or crawl.

I don't think any of the experts here would ever go back to rigid plastic pipe except for repairs in a compatible system.
 
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Old 03-03-14, 01:27 PM
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Not being nosey, just trying to help, but are you sure that you literally need to replumb the entire house? Supply and waste? A length or two of galvanized pipe in the supply line can slow the entire system, but can usually be remedied by replacing those sections. And improper venting, or other localized problems can cause the entire waste system to eventually back up.
 
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Old 03-03-14, 03:15 PM
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IMO your best off using pex pipe. Manifolds would be easy but I often run a trunk line down the center of the home and branch off from there..

Sorry to temporarily hi-jack this thread but the opportunity is now.

Lawrosa,

I tend to agree with you, but I'm not that versed or practiced in using pex. What are the advantages in using a manifold? I see them often but can't determine why they are better than trunk and branch lines. And why not do that with copper?

OK, return to your normally scheduled program.
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Old 03-05-14, 06:47 PM
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I will reiterate the vote for PEX for the supply lines and PVC for the drains/vents. The $60-$80 you'll spend on a PEX crimper will pay for itself in the time savings.

The most complicated part will be doing the drain/vents correctly. Even after quite a bit of plumbing myself, I still get caught up in some of the details.

I like this book, it goes through standard drain/vent patterns and basic plumbing
Plumbing a House (For Pros By Pros): Peter Hemp: 9781561583331: Amazon.com: Books

Norm, I know you asked Mike (Lawrosa) about manifolds, but I'll throw in my opinion.
Manifolds and home-runs work well to help ensure that all fixtures get the volume they need. The dishwasher starting up won't make the shower cold. They also replace the need for shutoffs at each fixture since each line can be individually shut off.

Personally, I wouldn't plumb a house with a manifold setup unless it was an under-slab or something non-typical. I'd rather use 3/4" mains and 1/2" branches. I find a manifold/home-run setup to be way too much piping and too much of a mess. My opinion only of course.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 05:01 AM
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Zorfdt,

Thanks for the answer. The idea of volume and mixture makes sense. It seems as though more newer installs are going the manifold route. But I also agree about it being a bit "complicated".
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