Low water pressure in whole house


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Old 03-05-01, 09:22 AM
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Hi, Im having trouble with low water pressure in my house, We have well water so I know that might be the problem right there but I was wondering if anyone had any ideas on getting more pressure out of the system, we have a 3/4 hp Myers well pump and pressure tank (about 5gallons)with pressure at 35psi, so will a bigger pump or tank do it?
Any help at all is appreciated.
 
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Old 03-05-01, 11:09 AM
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ok ive been messing around with the pressure switch my gauge was reading 35psi with the pump off, so i turned both nuts down about a 1/4 turn with a socket wrench not i think im getting about a 33on 52off ratio how high could i safely take these two settings without damaging something (the tank has a warning for 100 pounds) any ideas?
 
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Old 03-05-01, 01:23 PM
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Hang on, Old Guy will be along here any time to assist you. He is our resident well pump expert.
 
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Old 03-07-01, 04:23 PM
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If your pressure gauge is accurate, and you're getting 33 psi cut-on and 52 psi cut-off, you should be getting good water pressure in the house.
The larger spring-loaded nut in the pressure switch is for the cut-on, and the smaller is for the cut-off. They usually should be adjusted about 20 lbs apart.
The pressure tank should be about 2 lbs below the cut-on pressure.
A water well/pump is an integrated system that starts at the bottom of the well (a point for shallow, and a jet pump for a deep well); the pump, pressure tank and switch; and the supply lines. Any part of the system can impact your water pressure.
If you're getting 33-52, I suspect that your problem is not with your well/pump/tank/switch, but in the supply lines.
Do you have old galvanized pipes?
I think that you can probably increase the pressure in the tank by pumping it up with a bicycle pump, portable air tank or compressor to 2 lbs below whatever cut-on pressure that your well and pump can handle.
You can adjust the cut-on and cut-off on the pressure switch by turning the nuts down.
You will have to experiment with it to get it up to the max (and about 20 lbs apart), without making the pump labor, or cycle on and off too much. A 3/4 hp pump can usually do better than 52.
However, if your supply lines are galvanized, the only way to solve that problem is replacement. They will only get worse with time.
Good Luck!
 
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Old 03-07-01, 07:43 PM
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Ok thnx bunches

appreciate the lenghty responce im gonna try some stuff and let u know how it goes,
oh yah btw,
im installing a whirlpool tub in my basement but the drain is gonna have to run about 8ft across the floortothemaindrain
there is a toilet at about 4ft which seems to drain fine(ill be tying into the same drain) but im wondering if the tub will be ok too at that length and running level
ok thx
 
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Old 03-08-01, 03:47 PM
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The whirlpool tub installation needs the advice of a pro plumber.
A drain should have at least a 1/8"-1/4" slope per linear foot, and the line should be vented after the trap.
You may need to install that tub on a low platform.
Let the pros in here chime in on what you should do with that.
Good Luck!
 
 

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