Want to change tub faucet... not sure what to do about end of copper pipe

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Old 03-19-14, 10:35 PM
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Want to change tub faucet... not sure what to do about end of copper pipe

Hi, first post here. I want to replace my tub faucet with a new Moen faucet that slips over a 1/2" copper pipe and has a little screw to tighten it on. Only problem is that the copper pipe has an attachment at the end with a thread and I tried to unscrew it but it wouldn't come off (and I didn't want to try to hard and damage the pipes/connections behind the wall), and fear that it is welded on.

I ordered a small pipe cutter from Amazon to cut it off (should be long enough to still fit the faucet), but would ideally prefer not to cut the pipe unless it's my only option. See pic below. Any thoughts just by looking at it that it will need to come off?

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Old 03-20-14, 04:04 AM
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It has to be unsoldered. Using a propane or mapp gas torch, heat it and using a long handled pliers and a wet rag at the ready remove the fitting and wipe the pipe quickly to remove solder from pipe.
 
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Old 03-20-14, 07:53 AM
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Thanks for the reply.

I don't have a torch or any experience using one, so would simply cutting the pipe work as well? The pipe should be long enough to fit the faucet I bought even if I lop off the end with the attachment/fitting.
 
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Old 03-20-14, 08:52 AM
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I never replaced a tub spout with a slip over spout myself (I don't think?lol), but if you are sure there is enough pipe sticking out of the wall you could probably do it like this:

How to Replace a Tub Spout - Bob Vila

But if your pipe wouldn't be quite long enough after the cut, then instead you might have to unsolder the threaded fitting on the end of your pipe, as Norm suggested, and clean up the pipe end. That would give you a little more pipe to work with.

But it seems to me you just have to measure carefully and double check your instructions to make sure you would have enough pipe after a cut.
 
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Old 03-20-14, 09:52 AM
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Thanks for the input. I think I will pick up a propane torch today on the way home from work and give the desoldering a try. I'll post an update with pics after (hopefully) the successful replacement of the spout.
 
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Old 03-20-14, 12:10 PM
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hi h4-

Make sure the pipe is absolutely dry or else you wonít be able to unsolder the fitting. In the picture, however, it appears to be very dry.

If you grab the fitting with a pair of pliers while you heat with a torch, you will be able to twist and turn the fitting off. Eventually when it gets hot enough you will feel the fitting start to move as you are applying pressure with the pliers. Then you can keep twisting and turning and heating and eventually the fitting will slide off. I keep moving the torch evenly as best I can, all around the joint to get the joint hot enough. Just like you would do when you solder a fitting on. As far as I know thatís the correct way to unsolder a fitting. Works for me! LOL

As Norm says while the pipe is still hot wipe it with a wet rag to get the remaining solder off. When you get the fitting off the solder on the pipe will very quickly harden again when you remove the heat. But I believe you can put the torch on it again to soften and remove excess solder if it is no longer molten.

Yes, and as Norm says, use long handled pliers. I almost forgot that. LOL You donít want to get burned.

You will probably be fine, donít think there is much than can go wrong.

Good luck!
 
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Old 03-20-14, 12:37 PM
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Thanks for the great tips, I'll give it a try tonight and upload some pics of the (hopefully) successful results.
 
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Old 03-21-14, 12:48 PM
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Hey guys, I bought the propane torch and used it without difficulty to remove the fitting on the pipe and was able to install my new Moen slip-on faucet successfully.

Thanks for the help guys!

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Old 03-21-14, 05:32 PM
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Wow! That really looks nice. Very elegant. Iím keeping that Moen in mind for my next faucet.
 
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Old 03-22-14, 05:18 AM
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Also, Moen, Delta, Am Std, and most other name brands have a lifetime warranty.

MOEN..."Buy it for looks, buy it for life".
 
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