Does the crimping tool matter?

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Old 05-14-14, 04:04 AM
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Question Does the crimping tool matter?

I think my friend has a pex crimper not really sure what one, but I have looking just in case.
Found these one at Rona:
Pex Crimping Tool | RONA
If you needed to use the 3/4" fitting by a stud how do you get the crimpers in there? does the pex flex that would allow you to get the crimpers around?
are these the crimpers that come with something called a 'go, no go' gauge?

There are also these ones that are cheaper
http://http://www.lowes.ca/specialty-hand-tools/apollo-pex-38-in-to-1-in-combo-wrench_g1202855.html

Home depo has these ones
PEX-TOOLS | Pex Crimpmaker Compact Crimp Tool - 3/4 Inches | Home Depot Canada

any insight they all do the same thing but different styles...
 

Last edited by Huggyd; 05-14-14 at 04:31 AM.
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Old 05-14-14, 05:55 AM
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I have a long handle crimper that has spaces on the jaw for both 1/2" and 3/4" without changing dies. It's long handles make crimping easy but their long throw makes them difficult and sometimes impossible to use in tight places. I also have a compact 1/2" similar to the one you linked at HD that is great in tight places but they do require much more force on the handles.

With the combination of those two tools I've been able to crimp anywhere I've needed to. Sometimes I have to use a little forethought to make sure I can get my crimpers in place and occasionally will make difficult crimps out in the open before installing them up into a joist bay. When in doubt just hold your crimp tool in the area and see if you have room to cycle the jaws.

With whatever crimper you buy make sure you adjust it before use and check your crimps periodically. The tools usually come with a gauge to test the rings to make sure they are crimped enough.

Recently I've started trying the cinch type clamps. I've only started and have just done one home so it's too early to offer a long term recommendation but they are certainly easy to use and do seem to work. Best of all one tool will cinch the bands for any size tubing and the tool only needs to touch the side of the clamp and does not need to go completely around which makes them much easier to use in tight places.

 
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Old 05-14-14, 07:07 AM
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Is there some type of gauge for the cinch connection?
So clicking around on the rona site I see that there are plasic fittings and brass fitting is one better then other.
Brass elbow fitting | RONA

I used to run copper water line by drilling holes throu the basement ceiling joist but alot of the pictures and video I see online all seem to hold them to the bottom like Pilot Dane picture above. Can you not drill anymore?

@Pilot Dane: Do you have a personal preference on the cinch over crimp? do the cinch ones have some type of adjustment on them as well?
 
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Old 05-14-14, 07:35 AM
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This .pdf shows how this particular cinch tool is calibrated. I calibrated my tools and checked them frequently at first but once I learned that they did not change I only do it occasionally.

I only use brass fittings. I will use a plastic end plug for temporary applications but anything permanent gets brass mainly for it's structural strength. I don't drain the water from the pipes in my vacant rental homes that have PEX. I just make sure the fixtures & toilets are empty and let the pipes freeze. The brass fittings withstand the pressure and the PEX flexes/stretches to give the expanding pressure somewhere to go without harm.

You can still drill through joists and all the same guidelines apply. If it's a crawl space or basement where you don't need to finish it's much faster & easier to just run the PEX under the joists.



Initially I like the cinch better because it's easier to drag one tool when crawling under houses. I just don't have a long history with it yet so I can't recommend it as fully as the crimp rigs. But, I've not had a failure with the cinch style so right now I'm switching over to it.
 
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Old 05-14-14, 09:59 AM
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Thanks for the .pdf
so the plumbing rule is the same as the electrical rule, good to know.
 
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