Main sewer line removal

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Old 05-15-14, 01:37 PM
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Main sewer line removal

I bought an older 1970 house and i had the house main sewer line replaced. The plumber just dropped the main sewer line and left it on the ground of my crawl space. I need to remove it from my crawl space the only problem is that the pipe is long and heavy, so i called around some local rental place to see if they had a soil pipe cutter for rent. It turns out no one around my area has those any more do to the fact that everything thing is pretty much plastic now and days. So i was thinking of using a grander. I read some post that using a grader words pretty good.

So my question's are what type of grander do i need, as far as power? I saw this one on sale but i am not sure if it will do the trick or not?

Grander

what type of grander blades? Some people mentioned using diamond blades and some people suggested just using blades that would cut metal.

Any thoughts suggestions?

Thanks
 
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Old 05-15-14, 01:46 PM
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It's a "grinder"...not grander.

But why go to all the trouble? Drop a heavy blanket over it and smack it with a sledge hammer. Even a little 3 pounder will work. Wear a long sleeve shirt and long pants as well as eye protection (goggles or full face). You may have some small pieces to collect, but you can break it into 3-4ft pieces pretty easy.

If you want to go with a grinder, you just need a 4 or 5 inch angle grinder with a metal cutting blade. You can also use a reciprocating saw with a bi-metal blade.

Even more of an issue...was the plumber supposed to remove the debris? Thats part of most jobs.
 
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Old 05-15-14, 02:40 PM
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ha ha grinder. my bad.

really a sledge hammer would work? I 'll try that.

Ya that's what i thought, I called the plumber and he said it wasn't in the contract. I checked and he's right it wasn't written on the contact. I won't be recommending him or using him again. I figured that they would take it out.
 
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Old 05-15-14, 03:34 PM
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You'll need to smack it pretty hard and multiple times in the same place...but it will give. Cast iron is strong but relatively brittle.
 
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Old 05-15-14, 03:44 PM
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If the ground the pipe is lying on is relatively soft you could hit it a hundred times before it breaks. Placing a heavy piece of steel (old railroad track is excellent as it can cradle the pipe) under the pipe will help a lot. If nothing else, build it up with two piles of concrete pavers (or even short 2x4s) so the area you hit has no support directly under the point where the hammer strikes.

A sheet of canvas is probably better than a blanket to control any shards that may fly as the blanket will somewhat soften the blow from the hammer. Using no cover, but with you wearing a long-sleeved heavy flannel shirt along with a full face shield and gloves, you might find a brickset (3 inch wide cold chisel) and a three-pound hammer will make short work of it.
 
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Old 05-15-14, 06:11 PM
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I agree, a small sledge is a good solution.

If you use an angle grinder, I would use a simple metal cutting disc. Wear eye protection and a dusk mask or respirator, it will kick up a lot of metal dust.
 
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Old 05-20-14, 08:26 AM
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Would the concrete paves break once i start hitting the pipe?
you mentioned using a cold chisel, how would i actually use it? Do i just put it filed point on top of the pipe and hit it? So i need to hit the pipe where there is no support(2x4)? I currently have a Dasco Pro 2-1/4 in. x 7-1/2 in. Mason Chisel, will this chisel work? Do i angle the chisel or do i just put it horizontal to the pipe? Sounds obvious but i just want to make sure i am understanding it correctly?

I will get a Cotton Canvas Blanket and i think i will try the 2x4 since i probably wouldn't find old railroad tacks.

Thanks you guys for the info.
 
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Old 05-21-14, 01:52 AM
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Yes, the pavers will likely break but you only need one or two on each side of your desired cut/break in the cast iron, just enough to raise the pipe above the ground. Short pieces of wood will work just as well, the object is to get the pipe off the ground at the point you want to cut/break.
Yeah, that chisel will probably do the job and if you use it you probably don't need the canvas or blanket but DO use a full face shield and wear long sleeves and hit it HARD, don't just tap with the hammer but hit it as hard as you can.
 
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Old 05-21-14, 07:35 AM
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How long and big around is the pipe? Can't you just hook up a rope around the pipe and pull it out? Also is the cast iorn pipe still hooked to anything?
 
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Old 05-23-14, 08:20 AM
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Well hitting the cast iron pipe with a 4ls sledge hammer work great. I broke it up into 3-4 ft pieces and took it out through crawl space opening.

landfillwizard

How long and big around is the pipe? Can't you just hook up a rope around the pipe and pull it out? Also is the cast iorn pipe still hooked to anything?


Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ne...#ixzz32YJLu9pc
The pip was to long and too have to pull out.

Thank to all you who posted you save me allot of time.
 
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Old 05-23-14, 06:03 PM
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A carbide blade in a sawzall sometimes works too. A pipe cutter is another choice.
Reed Manufacturing - Soil Pipe Cutters - YouTube

Don't forget to take the pipe to your local scrap yard. That five cents per pound can buy a cup of coffee or whatever you drink.
 
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Old 05-23-14, 06:28 PM
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Freud actually makes a diamond (rather than carbide) grit blade specifically for cutting cast iron. It will still take a while but is an option when cutting is necessary rather than smashing. . .
 
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