How to replace my garage hose bib (includes picture)?

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-15-14, 03:05 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How to replace my garage hose bib (includes picture)?

Hello:
I was hoping someone could give me some advice on how to change my hose bib in my garage. The back-flow valve is leaky (and on there pretty good...figured it would be easier to replace the whole thing) so I figured I would investigate/attempt in replacing the whole thing. I shut off the vale to my garage bib, drained it, removed the putty/calking around the bib, and took the two screws out that held the whole hose bib in place. I gave the whole bib a very gentle counter-clockwise turn and it turned pretty effortlessly.

I turned it a bit more and, regardless of how many turns I do, it never comes off. Nor does it appear to be coming off. Again, the turning took minimal effort. Looking at the picture, does anyone have any idea how I get this sucker off?

Note: 10 year old townhouse. The piping for this hose bib is pvc pipe.

Appreciate any advice! Thanks!
 
Attached Images  
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-15-14, 03:25 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,119
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
Not good...the fact it turned easily can be a bad sign. Do you have any leaking in the wall or is there a cutoff valve you turned off? You need to remove that patch/blocking behind it or cut an access hole to see whats behind it.

When you say PVC...do you mean whats part of the bibb..or whats in the wall that it attaches to?

Very very odd to see PVC in a newer place like yours. Sure it's not PEX? Very flexible stuff or rigid?

Btw...replacing the backflow device is about a 5 min job or less.
 
  #3  
Old 05-15-14, 03:34 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 8,543
Received 174 Votes on 158 Posts
Have someone on the inside where the shutoff valve to the hose bib is located. Then turn the hose bib like you were doing. Can they see it turn (the piece of pipe attached to the valve). If it is in fact PVC then I suspect the glue has dried and broke. Maybe it's a compression fitting that has worked loose. At any rate as Gunguy says you need to look at what kind of damage has resulted by opening up that wall.
 
  #4  
Old 05-15-14, 03:34 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hey gunguy45:
Thanks for the response. No leaking, but I haven't turned on the main line to this valve (I shut it off prior to making my attempt).

It's definitely PVC pipe...white/vanilla colored pipe, elbows for angles, etc. Looks like your typical pvc piping.

I guess I should turn it on and see if it leaks?
 
  #5  
Old 05-15-14, 03:37 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Norm201: Unfortunately, the piping it's behind the wall and makes a handful of turns. I can't see that particular pipe in my utility room. Ugh.

In hindsight, I wish I would have posted prior to trying to remove the whole hose bib. I'm an idiot. I assumed it was a threaded bib that I could just turn and remove.
 
  #6  
Old 05-15-14, 03:41 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 8,543
Received 174 Votes on 158 Posts
Take off that wall board patch and send us another pic.

Don't turn on the water yet. You'll only cause more damage.


My advise is remove the pipe and hose bib after the shutoff valve and replace it.
 
  #7  
Old 05-15-14, 03:43 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Norm201: how do I remove the wall board patch with the bib being right there though? I gently (very gently) tugged on the hose bib and there is no give....not even an inch of give.
 
  #8  
Old 05-15-14, 03:45 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,119
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
It may indeed be threaded...but if thats ever the case, you need a wrench on what its attached to to prevent THAT part from moving.

Sorry, opening up the wall somehow (just enough to see the connection) is all you will hear til you do it.

Well, I take that back. Tighten it back up, then turn on the water. If no leakage, then maybe we can just move on to replacing the backflow preventer/vacuum breaker?

I do think that either a joint or the pipe has been compromised though. Any chance that was added by a prior owner? That would explain PVC. I just can't imagine it in the original building unless it was a last minute change order maybe. I mean, PVC just isn't used for whole house construction AFAIK.
 
  #9  
Old 05-15-14, 03:49 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,119
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
Is the patch plywood? Most likely so I imagine. And looks like it's probably screwed to a stud only on one side?

Since it's in the garage I'd probably just cut a hole directly above it and see whats going on. Easy to patch and if it's ugly, who cares. You do own this place don't you?
 
  #10  
Old 05-15-14, 03:49 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Gunguy45: I am the original owner (2004). Builders were throwing up these suckers as quickly as possible.....a building-boom here at the time I suppose. I was pretty clueless then and didn't know any better. Here is a pic of the utility room. The pipe runs down (the bottom valve is for the front bib; the top one is for my backyard bib) and around to my garage. Not a very far distance from this location.
 
Attached Images  
  #11  
Old 05-15-14, 03:52 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 8,543
Received 174 Votes on 158 Posts
You may have to cut a bigger hole and remove that wallboard around it. Replacing and patching wall board is no big problem And its in a garage so being super neat should not be a big deal.

I still don't thing you should turn on that water until you see what is behind the wall. Water damage can be very bad. I'd rather cause damage to dry wall board that pull apart wet wall board.

Just cut a 12" square around the hose bib and tear it out.
 
  #12  
Old 05-15-14, 04:05 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,119
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
Wow...never seen anything like that. Oh I hope you at least have CPVC for the hot water.

I do agree with Norm, since you are the owner and original...cut the hole big and just get in there and see whats up. It may seem complicated..but it will prob be a relatively easy fix once you get in there.
 
  #13  
Old 05-15-14, 04:15 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sounds good. Thanks guys! I'll attempt it this weekend and see whats going on!
 
  #14  
Old 05-15-14, 04:22 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
One last question for the evening: how does one actually go about removing the backflow valve from the actual hose bib? I wasn't sure how to remove the 'permanent' screw fixture so I could just unscrew the valve off.

I only ask b/c my backyard hose bib also has a leaky backflow valve. I didn't touch that one yet (thank goodness lol).

(Note: I don't have an electrical jig-saw or anything like that....in case the solution is to cut a line on it so I can unscrew it).
 
  #15  
Old 05-15-14, 04:28 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 8,543
Received 174 Votes on 158 Posts
What bothers me most about that pic is the fact that none of that pipe is anchored in any way. That disturbs me. My daughter had a house in Ithaca, NY that had all PVC/CPVC pipe. I never did trust it. Very flimsy and when the hot water was used is seemed to get kind of flexible. I guess that's what it was suppose to do but when it was run though the hall into an attached "barn" or shed I was always afraid of it freezing. I guess that's why I'm a big copper fan. I'm still a bit leery about PEX throughout the whole house. That's what she has now in PA. (another house disaster, but that's another story for another time. )
 
  #16  
Old 05-15-14, 06:09 PM
Z
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,065
Received 10 Votes on 10 Posts
Wonder if you could cut the PVC pipe where it goes straight into the wall in the garage and then pull the hose bib and connected pipe segment right out from the outside?

Then you could connect a new hose bib onto the proper length PVC pipe and push it back into the wall and into the garage. You would use a PVC coupling in the garage to connect the new PVC pipe to the old PVC pipe where you made the cut.

Seems like it should work? But what did I overlook? LOL

Well I do know that would only work if the pipe goes straight into the wall and straight out, no bends or turns inside the wall. lol

Whoops! Sorry, I just saw where you said it turns inside the wall. Never mind! lol
 

Last edited by zoesdad; 05-15-14 at 06:37 PM.
  #17  
Old 05-16-14, 03:07 AM
Y
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 173
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
A union?

From the way it turns, it's possible a union behind the patch.

As everyone suggested, I'd remove the 2 screws on the patch, cut along the patch and remove it outwards. It may be possible to put a hand between the patch and the wall to feel what is behind the patch. If it's a union, most PVC/CPVC unions can be installed/uninstalled by hand.

If the patch has to be cut, I'd replace it with 2 halves, one below and one above the pipe.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: