Washing machine water supply valve

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-28-14, 02:06 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 37
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Washing machine water supply valve

Hey guys,
I need to replace the valves that supply water to our washing machine. These are the valves that control the water coming out of the wall into the washer. I have attached a pic of one of the valves.

First off, I am having a hard time finding replacements for these valves. Any suggestions where I could find some?

Secondly, since I have not removed the valves I don't know what I should be looking for. It appears to me that my existing valves have a male connection going into the supply line? Do you agree?

Lastly is there anything special I need to know about removing and replacing these valves? My plan was to wrap the threads with Teflon tape and just screw them down reasonably tight.

I appreciate any reply's y'all can offer.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Charlie
 
Attached Images  
  #2  
Old 05-28-14, 02:53 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
What is the problem with the valves? Do they not turn off completely? I see a drip on the hose, is that the problem? If so, it isn't the valve, but a loose or damaged part in the hose coupling. If you need to replace the hose, I like Flood Safe washing machine hoses. They lock up if there is an inordinate amount of water released through the hose and prevent floods. BTDT
 
  #3  
Old 05-29-14, 11:05 AM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,569
Received 160 Votes on 142 Posts
Unfortunately those valves are somehow attached under the plastic box. They could be soldered or threaded. I don't know of any way to replace them without cutting some of the drywall out to get at the actual connection.

That said - as Larry was mentioning, you may be able to replace the washer in the valve or the hose to reduce the amount of work... depending on what exactly is leaking.
 
  #4  
Old 05-29-14, 08:28 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 37
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Chandler,
The valves do not turn all the way on or off. I had turned the valves off and was taking the hoses off when the water came rushing out. I originally thought the water was coming from the hoses so I screwed the hoses back on but left them a little open so the pressure could go down. Never went down. So I am sure I don't have a hose problem.

Thanks for taking time to reply.

Charlie
 
  #5  
Old 05-29-14, 08:33 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 37
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Zorfdt,
I can't find a valves like these so I feel it would be next to impossible to find replacement washers.
As soon as our rain stops, I am going to cut our water supply, to the house, off and see if I can unscrew the valves. Correct me if I am wrong but I would not think these are special valves for the washing machine water supply. If I can just see what kind of connection they have I think I should be able to find some type of valve that would work. Do you think my thinking is good?

Thanks for taking time to help.

Charlie
 
  #6  
Old 05-30-14, 03:34 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
If you can dismantle the assembly, consider replacing the assembly with this or something similar. It turns both hot and cold off or on in one motion. Really a good idea at each trip to the washer.
Homewerks Worldwide, 1/2 in. Brass MPT x MHT Dual Washing Machine Valve with IPS, VWMDUAF3B at The Home Depot - Tablet
 
  #7  
Old 05-30-14, 05:40 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,492
Received 292 Votes on 262 Posts
What Chandler suggest is the best thing since sliced bread. I always suggest these to our customers. I don't know why but people seems to not want to to turn off a typical hot and cold water faucet for washing machines but will always pull this lever style. These are even better than the using the Flood Safe hoses. The problem with these Flood Safes hoses is that they tend to hide a problem when and if leak occurs.
 
  #8  
Old 05-30-14, 09:29 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 37
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Chandler,
I had found this valve assembly in my search for a replacement and I agree it looks to be a good choice. But, until I can get the old valves off and see what type of connections they have I won't know for sure which replacement valves would work best.

Again, I thank you for your help and advice.

Charlie
 
  #9  
Old 05-30-14, 01:29 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Charlie, I hate saying it, but it may be sheetrock time a good clean cut in the surrounding area above and below your present valve box from stud to stud center, will give you ample working space and you can change the entire box out if necessary, or at least the valves. Good luck, and let us know if we can help.
 
  #10  
Old 05-30-14, 02:48 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,113
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
Or for people who won't even use the single lever style, there's this...TimeOut 1/2 in. Brass Washing Machine Automatic Timer Valve with Installation Box-2354RBBX at The Home Depot

If they are tightly threaded, you have to get a wrench on what they are threaded to. If it's copper with an adapter sweated on (or some sort of plastic with an adapter), you could damage it. If they are steel, you could unscrew them further down.

I'd investigate replacing the washers, they are pretty standard and those valves don't look that old. A lot less work as well.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: