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Replacing my bathroom vanity- questions about stop valves and supply lines

Replacing my bathroom vanity- questions about stop valves and supply lines

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  #1  
Old 09-15-14, 09:38 AM
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Question Replacing my bathroom vanity- questions about stop valves and supply lines

Hi Plumbing and Piping,

I'll be replacing our bathroom vanity, but I have some questions before getting under the sink. As a visual, here's the old vanity:


And here's what it looks like underneath:




Some questions before I get to work:
  • Is there any special way to go about removing the stop valves? It looks like I can take an adjustable wrench to it.
  • I'm thinking of just replacing the copper supply lines with the flexible, braided type- like this one from Home Depot. Is this a good idea?
  • I'm also thinking of replacing the stop valves and the P-Trap with shiny, brand new ones. Like this Sharkbite valve. Again, am I right for considering this, or should I just re-use the old parts? I'm only considering this because everything that was originally installed by the builder just seems so cheap and poor quality.
  • Is there anything else that I should consider before starting this project?

Thanks, everyone.
 
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Old 09-15-14, 12:14 PM
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It looks like you really don't need much plumbing work.
I would leave angle stops as is, they look fine.
The braided supply lines are a good idea, hand tighten plus 1/4 turn, check for leaks before tightening any more than that.
P-Trap doesn't need to be chrome, these are good for exposed plumbing.
IMO, chrome P-traps are harder to get set right than PVC or ABS.
 
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Old 09-15-14, 10:01 PM
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Thanks for the advice, Handyone. A question about the braided supply lines- how can I be sure that the one I'm considering buying is the correct size? Is 3/8 x 1/2 a standard size?

Also, I'll need to remove the angle stops in order to replace the vanity- is it possible to remove the old angle stops, then re-attach them, without breaking them?
 
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Old 09-16-14, 02:47 AM
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Yes, the braid you show is the correct one to use. If you remove the stop valves, since they are attached to PEX, you can replace them with PEX valves using a crimper, or Sharkbite (easier). You will need to turn off the water and install Sharkbite terminal ends to prevent leaking and so you can restore water usage while you work on the bathroom. If you have a Dremel type tool, you can remove the PEX ring, but be careful not to nick or otherwise damage the stop valve itself if you plan on reusing them. I would replace them. Do you have the $60 crimping tool?
 
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Old 09-16-14, 09:37 AM
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Hi Chandler,

I'm a really novice DIYer, so I'd probably go with the Sharkbite option. Do I need anything more than adjustable wrenches for removing and installing stop valves?

And unfortunately, I don't have a Dremel-type tool, or a crimping tool.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 12:39 PM
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You will cut the PEX behind the stop valve and install the new ones on the PEX once you have the vanity in place.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 11:04 PM
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Just want to make sure that I understand the process. Is it still necessary to cut the PEX behind the stop valve if I'm replacing it with angled valve like this one? Maybe I'm not understanding the process correctly, but I thought that the old one just loosens off, kind of like in this video, nd you fasten the new one on.

Ugh... I feel like such a plumbing noob.
 
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Old 09-17-14, 03:15 AM
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What you have now are not Sharkbite, and cannot be removed with the removal tool. Yours are crimped on with a crimping tool and copper band. It must be cut off. The Sharkbite stop valve will slip over the PEX and lock on.
 
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Old 09-17-14, 09:46 AM
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Thanks for your continued help with this, chandler.

So if I use the exact same time of angle stop (Brasscraft 1/4 turn), will I be able to re-use the compression ring without having to cut the pipe? I really just want to make this job as simple as possible.

Also, check out the circled image below. In the red circle, I noticed some sort of epoxy where the copper water supply tube meets the angle stop. Any special way to disconnect that water supply tube from the angle stop?

And in the green circle, one of the tubes is plastic. Will this present any problems if I do need to cut the pipes?

 
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Old 09-26-14, 05:09 PM
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Problems!

I'm back with the vanity issue.

So, I'm still trying to remove the sink so I can replace my vanity, but I've run into two problems:


I tried to loosen the nuts on the angle stop to disconnect the supply line, but they won't budge. They're in the green square in this image. The copper tubing is bending and when I try to loosen the nut I'm hearing a cracking noise (but the nut isn't moving). I hate the builder of this house already.

Also, See these nuts under the basin (circled in red)? The area is too cramped, and my basin wrench won't fit. What other tool can I use to access those nuts?
 
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Old 09-26-14, 06:17 PM
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Couple of things:
- Chandler explained how to change the angle stops.
- Are you trying to save the old sink and faucet??
- The compression fitting you pointed out should be the easiest to remove. It doesn't need to be very tight or have some type of adhesive. Remember Lefty Loosey, Righty Tighty.

First, the faucet nuts. Use a deep well socket or a very small wrench/pliers to loosen. Fittings are brass and once you get nuts loose, they should come off fairly easily.

If you're not saving faucet, cut supply lines above valve. If you are saving faucet, still cut lines above valve. When reconnecting, you can use 3/8 to 3/8 supply line with coupler to connect to old lines.
 
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Old 09-26-14, 08:49 PM
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Hi Handyone,,

No, I'm not saving the old sink and faucet. We bought a new, shiny set.

Chandler mentioned that I'll need a crimper. But I don't know anything about this type of tool. Is this the tool he's referring to?

And is it worth using a torch on the existing angle stop before attempting to change the angle stops?
 
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Old 09-27-14, 04:23 AM
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No, that is for sheet metal. You will need a PEX crimper. Will run about $60 and is available in the plumbing section of the box stores. It will have the capacity for 3/4 and 1/2" PEX.
 
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Old 09-27-14, 04:47 AM
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Hello...

Do yourself a favor and leave those angle stops... Whats the point of replacing them??? They are quality pex 1/4 turn valves.

As far as the supply lines this nut should be easy to turn with a crescent wrench. Make sure you hold the valve when trying to turn counter clockwise to loosen.




Then just remove the vanity after disconnecting the trap. No need to remove faucet. Just carry the whole thing out to the garbage..

You will probably need to remove the top of the vanity first. Then you will have access to the screws that hold the vanity to the wall....
 
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Old 09-27-14, 05:26 AM
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I also agree with Lawrosa. If the isolation valves are not leaking then just keep them there. The SS braided supply lines are a good idea. If you're not saving the old stuff just break to remove it.
 

Last edited by Norm201; 09-27-14 at 06:34 AM.
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Old 09-27-14, 06:02 AM
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The OP wants a clean removal without making a large hole(s) in the backing.
 
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Old 09-27-14, 08:25 AM
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That's correct, Chandler.

Lawrosa- I've tried exactly that and it's not budging. What's making this removal really difficult is the cheap quality plumbing that's already installed. Every time I try to loosen/remove something it feels like something's going to break. The entire townhouse seems to be build this way.

This is going to be a lot of fun.
 
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Old 09-27-14, 08:53 AM
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I've tried exactly that and it's not budging.
Hold the valve with a plyers and turn the supply nut counter clockwise with a crescent wrench. Use a bigger wrench if needed..

This shows a supply line being removed...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6elP6Xj_NAo
 
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Old 09-27-14, 09:22 AM
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I'm surprised you're running into trouble here. That compression nut should release easily.
As Lawrosa said, just leave valves. Measure accurately for your cutouts and the hole in back of cabinet doesn't need to be that large to pass valves through.
You can cover cutout with a split flange. Split flange is more than large enough to cover hole.

You posted a very clear picture of angle stops and I see no reason why they would be seized. These are brass fittings and don't rust.
 
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Old 09-27-14, 07:14 PM
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Huzzah! After hours of cursing, I finally managed to loosen the nut connecting the water supply. I used lawrosa's suggestion and it worked. But now there's a slight leak (probably because that old plumber's putty crumbled when I loosened it). Since I'll be replacing the water supply line, I don't think I need to worry about this (?).

But now here's my next challenge- the P-trap. How the heck does this come off? The part in the green came off easily. But are the parts in red and blue supposed to twist right off? Because my pipe wrench isn't doing the job.



And maybe I'm getting ahead of myself, but what do I do if my new sink doesn't align with the existing P-Trap properly?
 
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Old 09-28-14, 02:50 AM
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The leak should stop when you turn the valve off. Looking from the top of the trap, the ring in green should turn clockwise, and should not take a wrench to loosen.
 
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Old 09-28-14, 05:37 AM
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Also you should not have a problem with a new sing trap fitting. Other than possibly cutting the tail piece or maybe getting an extension everything should fit exactly as before.

Hint...trap slip nut fittings need only be hand tight. The secret is to have everything plumb and level.
 
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