Location of test tees behind finish wall

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Old 09-16-14, 10:32 AM
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Location of test tees behind finish wall

As the title says, when I place test tees in vent lines, for example, to divide the testing of my two story system into sections, can I cap the tee with a screw in plug and bury that behind a finished wall or ceiling, or must threaded intersections like that remain accessible?

Also, I removed a leaded on toilet flange to service weight cast iron so lower the flange. What is the better choice - to lead on another lower flange or to use the oatey cast iron/brass retrofit flange?
 
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Old 09-16-14, 07:34 PM
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Why would you install a T or cleanout and bury it behind a finished wall? Once it's behind a finished wall it's almost useless and likely to be forgotten. Either don't put it in or create an access panel. But... I hate cleanouts in the finished part of the home as it's very difficult to work cleanly with a snake or rod so they are best accessed from outside where slinging poo is not as big a problem.

"I removed a leaded on toilet flange to service weight cast iron so lower the flange" I don't understand this sentence. Are you trying to lighten the weight of the cast iron piping? I don't know of anyone leading these days and in California I'm surprised the environmental police have not arrested you for even mentioning lead. I'd go with the retrofit flange if it will work in your situation.
 
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Old 09-17-14, 09:01 AM
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Thanks for the reply. I need the test tees to divide a two story system into testable pieces that don't exceed the allowable 10 feet of head for the no-hub couplings. The test tees are in the vents. I will place test balls there and test the top half of the system, then place the balls lower to test the bottom half. No need to access the tees later as all the runs with actual water in them are short and vertical before reaching underfloor cleanouts.

I wasn't trying to reduce the weight of the cast iron - service weight is actually 4.3 inches OD vs. no hub which is 4.38 inches. The retrofit flange needs to fit the smaller OD. Turns out my local plumber still does lead-on but I'm going with the flange that I can install myself.
 
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Old 10-04-14, 01:54 PM
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Unless that's a new rule (max 10' of head) I've always just tested everything at once. The rule I've followed is 'a minimum of 10 foot of head' on a fitting, but I've never been called on that (the fitting is seeing all the pressure it's ever going to see).
 
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