New sink and faucet.

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Old 09-23-14, 04:28 PM
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New sink and faucet.

I've started ordering items for my bathroom remodel. I received the new faucet for the sink and it came with a drain. I didn't expect that and also didn't think much about the drain at this point. So I am wondering if the drain will fit the sink. Here is the faucet I purchased: Pfister F-042-SL Selia Single Hole Bathroom Sink Faucet (Low Lead Compliant) - Build.com and here is the sink spec sheet: http://s1.img-b.com/build.com/mediab.../ceramic16.pdf Here is the page for the sink: Bates And Bates P1212.WH White Socialites 12-1/2" Self Rimming Bathroom Sink - Build.com

The drain that came with the faucet is spec'd as 1 1/2". The hole in the sink is shown to be 1 5/8". Sounds good. The lip in the sink is shown to be 2 1/2". When I measure the drain, it is 2 1/8". Do I have anything to worry about with this?
 
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Old 09-23-14, 05:25 PM
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The sink drain is a standard size.
You're OK.
If you're getting a stone counter for the vanity, the only thing I would do different is get an under mount sink. Making the cutout for the sink and mounting it would cost extra though.
 
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Old 09-23-14, 05:35 PM
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You can do either with this sink. I will be doing undermount.
 
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Old 09-23-14, 05:36 PM
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Droo - you have a large project going on and I am having a hard time following all the different threads and points you are after. Could you condense the number of posts and keep it tight to help us stay on focus with your project? Anyway......

Bathroom vanity sink drains are standard size and what you have should fit fine. What kink of counter top are you installing that you would have to drill through for the faucet to mount. A top load sink is fine, just need to coordinate with the faucet that we have enough room to mount and still have water flow over the lip so water flows in the sink and not over the counter. Everything under the sink would be the same regardless of what was above.
 
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Old 09-23-14, 05:50 PM
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If you're getting a stone counter for the vanity, the only thing I would do different is get an under mount sink. Making the cutout for the sink and mounting it would cost extra though.
On this point I dis-agree. But it's strictly a matter of current style and personal preference. If you get the under mount sink it will need to be professionally mounted. Where as the surface mount can be mounted by yourself. And when and if the time comes that you want or need to change out the sink the under mount will need to be done professionally (at least most run of the mill handymen can't or won't do it).

When I did my kitchen it was suggested strongly by the counter top installers and the sink people that the current style is under mount. I agreeded about the current style but opted for the surface mount that I can handle in an evenings time. We bought a very deep stainless double bowl sink that we liked. Now however, we are thinking of changing to a less deep bowl since our needs have changed. It will cost me only the price of the new sink. My son also did a kitchen remodel and opted for the under mount. He can't change it by himself. The sink manufacturer and counter top people claim no warranty if not professionally installed.

Cost and time not withstanding, styles and fads change. As with colored appliances the avocado green and harvest gold was all the rage back when, but white or black never goes out of style. Same as the current fad in stainless steel appliances. To me it looks like a restaurant kitchen as opposed to a home kitchen.

Just my 2 cents + 1 cent for inflation.
 
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Old 09-23-14, 06:55 PM
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I just try to avoid top mount sinks and (self rimming) sinks.
I have worked on many a kitchen where caulk failure has destroyed sink base cabinet and surrounding underlayment. I should be happy about that!
A nice top mount sink, like cast iron or nice china, is beautiful. I would only recommend staying on top of the sealant and not let it get out of control.
A modern under mount sink attached to stone, as opposed to the old mortar bed under mount sinks, should be replaceable. You need to have access to the mounting clips/studs and this is where a lot of counter top guys take shortcuts.
 
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Old 09-23-14, 07:11 PM
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Droo - you have a large project going on and I am having a hard time following all the different threads and points you are after. Could you condense the number of posts and keep it tight to help us stay on focus with your project?
I started a general thread about my project over a year and half ago in the General Discussion forum. There never really seemed to be much interest in it so I never kept up keeping everything together. My latest questions are very specific to products I am using and not to the project as a whole. My tile questions are in the tile forum. That doesn't belong in the plumbing forum. I mistakenly posted the question about the existing shower in the General Discussion forum and it was moved to the tub and shower forum. If it was in plumbing, I would have tacked my sink question onto it. I'm not sure how much I can keep things consolidated while keeping with the forum topics. A quick synopsis: I have a very small bathroom I will be gutting. I will insulating with spray foam, replacing electrical, tile floors with radiant heat, new toilet, custom vanity, new shower kit. The existing bathroom was installed in 1951.

We have yet to chose the top. Some kind of stone or quartz probably. I see no reason why I would ever change the sink or why I wouldn't be able to do it myself. It is the smallest porcelain sink I could find.
 
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Old 09-23-14, 07:29 PM
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Droo,
My house was built in 1956. I've been through all you're doing. The important thing is once you commit to doing something, you feel pretty good about it. I think you have that covered.
These guys and gals here really know their stuff and I learn something every day.
 
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Old 09-24-14, 04:28 PM
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Yeah. This is basically the end of my renovation. I've done the other three rooms and just have this bathroom.
 
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Old 09-24-14, 05:24 PM
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That is a tiny sink, any reason you are going that small? A standard drop in would be around 19" wide, yours is 12.5" wide. How wide is the cabinet that you are updating? I have gotten the illusion of more room by installing a cabinet in the corner that is pentagon shaped and pushed the basin into the corner on the 45 degree. This eases the space near the toilet in a tight bathroom provided you have the clearance near the doorway.
 
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Old 09-24-14, 05:31 PM
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I will be making a new cabinet for the sink. The counter top will be about 16" deep x 42" long. Any deeper and the door won't open.
 
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Old 09-24-14, 05:37 PM
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Take it 16" out to around 8" from the door way and then angle the cabinet out 45 degrees to standard depth 22". Should give you enough to clear the door, ease your entry into the bath and provide a standard size vanity experience (whatever that means ). I have done this same thing in the past. You leave the first 8" or whatever shallow as open underneath so that you have a place to put your trash can and then you have a standard cabinet after. May allow you to save effort and purchase something off the shelf.


Here is one I did at our community center to clear the doorway.
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Here is what it originally looked like.
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Last edited by czizzi; 09-24-14 at 05:53 PM.
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Old 09-24-14, 05:57 PM
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See shower thread for bathroom size.

I am a custom cabinet maker. I will not be buying off the shelf. The size fo the space does not allow for your idea. Bathroom is about 46" wide by 72"
 
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Old 09-24-14, 06:28 PM
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Czizzi, Like what you did.
 
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