how to solder this addition?

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Old 10-11-14, 06:56 AM
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how to solder this addition?

I am adding zones to the existing water heating system.

From the picture you can see starting from that pointed thread connection, the new addition is on the right side.

From left to right after the male fitting, there are a 45 degree turn, a tee, a 45 degree turn and a tee again. They are located closely.

My question is what's the sequence to join them together?

I am thinking the following sequence:

1. solder the first short straight section with male fitting offline;
2. put above unit in with thread sealant and tight them;
3. solder the first 45 elbow and others online.

does above sequence sound right?

at step 2, how to prevent the heat being transferred to the new soldered join and the thread? use a damp cloth?

thanks,
 
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Old 10-11-14, 07:41 AM
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I think you might be over-thinking this. I would probably scrub everything up (be sure you do that, I see a lot of those pipes aren't scrubbed yet) flux it, and solder it all together (with the exception of the threaded fitting which you should keep separate until the end) on the bench (upside down, resting on the top of the ball valves). Make sure it's all aligned correctly (straight) before you start.

Start from one end or the other and use the heat from the last to continue with the next joint. Don't stop once you start... just keep soldering... from one to the next. Compared to the other joints which will heat up quick, your ball valves will take a lot more heat, so you may need to add some additional flux to those joints (just brush the pipe and let it run down) as you heat them up so that you are sure that you're not boiling it all away as you heat it.

Once its completely assembled, with the exception of the threaded fitting, thread that fitting on, using your tape and tee paste, then clean/scour the inside of that fitting and the outside of the pieces that you pre-assembled, insert it, support it, and solder it.

Why would you care if heat is transferred to the threaded joint? The only thing you need to worry about is not melting the PVC behind the pipes when you make that last connection.

If you're not using Mapp gas on your torch, get some. It's hotter and so will heat the work up faster.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 09:58 AM
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"
Why would you care if heat is transferred to the threaded joint? The only thing you need to worry about is not melting the PVC behind the pipes when you make that last connection.
"


Because i am worrying the heat may burn out the thread tape and the thread sealant.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 03:20 PM
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hi diy007 –

I’m just a newbie, beware lol -

I would run your new configuration through the Boilers forum. You will get exceptionally good advice there in terms of your tee spacing etc. as those types of variables seem to be significant in a boiler system.

I’m no expert but I’ve added a fair amount to my plumbing system and I basically agree with XSleeper. But one of the things I’ve found is aligning components is sometimes a daunting task (for me at least). Are you going to solder the stuff in your picture as your next step? If it were me I would dry fit together all of the components, including the pumps and the risers from the pumps, all the way up to the joists.

Then I would take it all apart and on the workbench and I would solder the pipes into the ball valves/pump flanges. Then put it all back together in place, tighten the flanges at the pumps and solder the tees and the elbows last. I think basically in the order you outlined. I’ve soldered pretty close to many threaded connections where I had used Teflon tape and RectorSeal #5 and by using a wet rag on the connection the connection integrity was preserved when I soldered.

Now this all presupposes that those flanges are for pumps. Maybe? lol

Just seems to me a little vertical misalignment at the tees in your picture could translate into a bigger problem as you travel up the vertical. But, I’m just a newbie and may be way out in left field. If so … never mind lol.


OK - I think I see lol - you are going to use PEX and alignment problems go away. I think - lol
 

Last edited by zoesdad; 10-11-14 at 06:03 PM.
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Old 10-12-14, 09:04 AM
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Personally, I would insert a union fitting in between the threaded fitting and the first 45 fitting. You would be able to solder up everything on a bench and then connect the threaded fitting to the other end and then connect the union together.
 
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