Installing a Wye into existing pipe


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Old 11-08-14, 06:12 PM
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Installing a Wye into existing pipe

Hi,

I'm going to be installing some plumbing in the basement in order to hook up a washing machine in the basement and I'm wondering if anyone has any tricks for installing a Wye into an existing 4" drain pipe. I have seen some rubber wye's that seem like they would be easier to get in place with just cutting a piece of the drain pipe out, but it seems like it would hold up better over time if I install a solid PVC wye. The only problem is that I'm not sure how I would get it in there with out being able to move all the existing pipe around. I was kind of thinking if I cut a section of drain out that was bigger than necessary and then installed the wye on end end and then used another section of 4" PVC with a union to to tie it back to the other side. That just doesn't seem like the easiest way though. I guess I'm just wondering if there is some other easy way that I'm over looking.

Thanks,
Nathan
 
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Old 11-08-14, 06:32 PM
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You do not say what the existing pipe is but it sounds like it is PVC. Like you said if you can not move the pipe it is tough. So on existing PVC cut out a bigger piece so you can fit the PVC Wye and Pipe glued into the ends in. On either side you will use a no hub coupling (stainless steel with rubber gasket) available at the big box stores. Make sure the Wye and pipe are about 1/2 inch less than the piece cut out it gives you a 1/4 inch of play on either side. This will work if the existing pipe is cast iron as well. There are other ways to do this but this is the easiest and a good solid solution.

Good Luck
 
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Old 11-08-14, 08:23 PM
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You must use a shielded fitting as the rubber ones are only for use underground where they will be supported by the surrounding earth.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 04:45 AM
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Just to clarify and repeat with John and Furd said, you need to use two no-hub couplings. They look like this:
[ATTACH=CONFIG]41445[/ATTACH]

You start with your new wye and a 3" piece of PVC cemented on each end. The existing pipe (presumably PVC) is cut to that size, plus about 1/4". Then use a pair of no-hub couplings to join it all together.

When installing the no-hub couplings, the metal shielded part can be slid up the pipe, and the rubber portion 'folded' in half to allow the new piece to be slid in. Easy peasy!
 
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Old 11-09-14, 05:07 PM
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Thanks a lot guys. You were correct in guessing that the existing drain pipe is PVC (4"). I haven't seen that type of coupler before, but that seems like it is exactly what I need. In my original post I mentioned trying to do it with hard fittings and a union, but what I was meaning was a PVC coupler. I just didn't know how I was going to get in on there and glued together. I had envisioned slipping the coupler up on the pipe and then once the new section was in place slipping it over the joint, but that seems like a mess if there was glue on the pipe. This Is perfect because it eliminates the glue.

On a side note, would you guys be concerned about the little lip that I'm going to create (where the pipes come together underneath the coupler) acting as a catch and clogging up the drain? I'll obviously debur the pipes and put a little chamfer on them so I'm guessing it will be ok. It crossed my mind though that I may be creating a prime spot for a .... sewage damn to build, which is obviously the last thing I want!
 
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Old 11-09-14, 05:42 PM
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I should have also mentioned the drain pipe I'm tapping into is a horizontal run.
 
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Old 01-02-15, 05:37 PM
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Finished

Thanks a lot guys for the advice about the no hub couplings. I finally got around to getting the Wye installed and it worked out pretty good. I definitely would have had some major trouble though if it weren't for the no hub couplings.

...now on to the rest of the project.


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Old 01-02-15, 06:14 PM
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That is not even code what you did there..

You need min 18" stand pipe and a trap from what I know...

Whats that device on top there???

Sewer gas in the home may cause sickness...[from no trap]

Sry but thats very bad....
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 01-02-15 at 09:26 PM.
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Old 01-02-15, 09:15 PM
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The couplings is where the right ended, no trap, stand pipe height wrong, the washing machine is going to pump up what 8 feet to the top of you're drain then?
 
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Old 01-03-15, 05:30 AM
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Sorry, I should have been more clear. Yesterday I only got as far as installing the Wye. That's just an expandable plug in the top of the short pipe to seal it off until I get the rest of the piping installed (to prevent the gases in the house).

I'm planning on getting one of these and then connecting it up to this:
Zoeller 105-0001 Laundry Pump Package Including M53 Sump Pump - - Amazon.com

I was planning on installing a trap after this pump/box and then going up to the Wye. I should be able to accommodate the 18" requirement on top of the Wye as that drain pipe is situated that it leaves me a decent bit of room above it.

If you see any other concerns please let me know. Better to make adjustments now.

Thanks for the advice.
Nathan
 
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Old 01-03-15, 07:21 AM
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Not a fan of zoeller... But I see what your doing..

IMO liberty is a better choice..

https://libertypumps.com/Products/Ca...?p=19&s=8&c=15

Dont forget to vent and install a backwater valve.. Your biggest problem will be lint. I would install a utility sink if it were I..
 
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Old 01-03-15, 05:32 PM
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Anything in particular that you like about the Liberty over the Zoeller? Just checked on Amazon and that one you mentioned looks like it runs about the same price and they both get 4.5 stars so either seems pretty decent. Just curious to your experience with them though.

I actually have a utility sink already bought and waiting in the basement to go in. I was thinking the same thing that the pump would probably last longer without needing to pass through all that link. The pumps say they can handle it, but I'm sure they'll last longer without it.

When you say backwater valve are you talking about a check valve? That Zoeller comes with a check valve, but if I go with the Liberty and it doesn't I'll definitely get one separately and install it as well.

I don't want to get to side tracked on this tread since it was originally about installing the Wye, but I do have a question about the vent for the system. I'll start a new thread and would appreciate any feedback on it since it sounds like you are familiar with these setups.

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-03-15, 06:31 PM
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Just curious to your experience with them though.

Warranty and customer service.............


The pumps say they can handle it, but I'm sure they'll last longer without it.
Lint??? I would install this IMO... Its just a recommended product from what I know...I am not affiliated...

Septic Protector
When you say backwater valve are you talking about a check valve?
Somewhat...

Mainline is my preferred product...

Home - Mainline

I'll start a new thread and would appreciate any feedback on it since it sounds like you are familiar with these setups.


Please keep same thread...
 
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Old 01-03-15, 06:53 PM
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Thanks for the links and info Lawrosa.

It looks like those back water valves are more complicated than just a check valve and it sounds like they allow venting. I'm not completely following how to use those. I was planning on installing a check valve after the pump and trap at the bottom of the vertical pipe leading to the main drain. Would those back water valves go there as a direct replacement for the check valve or do they fit into the picture somewhere else? I was looking at this one specifically:
Fullport Backwater Valve - Mainline
I really like that this one has the clear lid. That would make it real nice to confirm it's working as expected.

I missed your note about sticking with this thread and had already started another, but here is the question about the vent that I have. I'll put a note on the other thread directing over here.

Since there will only be grey water going into the drain and it will be pumped from floor on up, I'm wondering if it is ok to not vent up through the roof and only run a vent pipe up 6 feet or so in the basement. Basically, my setup is going to be a utility sink (which the washer will dump into) and then a drain pipe running over to the pump basin and then the pump basin will be plumbed into the main drain line in the house. I plan to put a trap below the utility sink and then immediately after the pump.

I'm guessing the line that goes from the pump to the main drain should not be vented since that drain is force fed by the pump, but I was figuring the drain line running from the utility sink to the pump will need a vent though since it is going to be a gravity fed line.

It seems to me that the vent really shouldn't need to go up through the roof or outside though since it is only going to be venting a grey water line.

Does that make sense? Or is it code that it has to be outside? If it is code, what is the reasoning behind it? If I vent it inside is there a minimum height that I need to be above the pump box?

I could route the vent outside fairly easily, although getting it above the roof line would be tricky.

Thanks in advance for the advice.
 
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Old 01-04-15, 05:21 PM
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Looked at those Backwater valves more from Mainline. That looks like it would have been great to install on my main sewer line after the Wye fitting. Wish I would have seen that prior the Wye install.

Got the Liberty pump box on order this afternoon.
 
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Old 01-06-15, 05:38 PM
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Lawrosa (or anyone else) do you have any insight on the venting question?
 
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Old 01-06-15, 06:04 PM
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AAvs are often allowed in many municipalities... I install them 95% of the time..

Look at this pic. But extend the vent up 3 ft above the flood plain of the sink.. And install an AAV.. ( Whats in the pic of vent into sink is not right)



[ATTACH=CONFIG]44450[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 01-06-15, 06:27 PM
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Ok, nice. I've heard of those aav's, but didn't think of that. That shouldn't be too bad then.

Does the line that runs from the utility sink to the pump not need to be vented? My pump is going to probably be about 10' from my utility sink and I was thinking that if I didn't vent right after the trap underneath the sink I would probably suck the trap dry. My washer and dryers doors open such that the washer needs to be on the left hand side and my main drain line is off on the right hand side. I figured it's probably better to have the pump closer to the main drain and then just have a longer drain pipe leading to the pump.

Something else I wanted to ask you. A few posts back you had mentioned something about the line going into the Wye in my main drain needing to be 18" off of the drain. That was prior to me describing the full setup though. Does that requirement still stand being that I'm extending that PVC down to the pump? I should be able to meet it, but if it's not necessary I don't want to make the vertical higher than needed. Also, going the 18" is going to make me route the pipe in a different path that I would prefer due to other pipes.
 
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Old 01-06-15, 06:33 PM
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Another quick question, do plumbers typically install gas piping? I want to get someone else out to do the gas line for me and I'm not positive who I should be calling. I think of water when I think of plumbers, but then gas piping is PIPE so it seems like plumbers probably do it. I just don't want to call a plumber and have them tell me they can do it if it's not something they are actually familiar with.
 
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Old 01-06-15, 07:20 PM
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Does the line that runs from the utility sink to the pump not need to be vented?
No

My pump is going to probably be about 10' from my utility sink
Why? Put it closer as the picture shows


main drain needing to be 18" off of the drain. That was prior to me describing the full setup though. Does that requirement still stand being that I'm extending that PVC down to the pump?
No... I thought you were doing a standard stand pipe..


Also put in a standard 2" back water valve.. goes on the horizontal..

Sioux Chief 2 in. PVC Hub x Hub Backwater Valve-869-2P - The Home Depot


I would have rolled the Y on a 45 and not straight up as you did. After you roll it you install a st 45 then your backwater valve..


[ATTACH=CONFIG]44454[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 01-06-15, 07:24 PM
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I would have installed a standard Y and put the st 45 180 degrees from what it shows here...

[ATTACH=CONFIG]44455[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 01-07-15, 05:41 PM
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That last attachment didn't come through right for me, but I think I know what you are saying.

The pump just showed up at the house today and along with pump I ordered a "Campbell Mfg Llc 1.5" Quietsump Check Valve" that I was going to place right after the pump on the veritical.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

If I install this check valve I shouldn't need the back water valve. Right?

I was wanting to put the pump on the other side of the room from the washer so that the pump could be closer to the main drain line. I have some space behind the wall that I'm building, and I was planning on routing the drain lines back there so it won't be a big deal to run the drain line across the room. I was also going to route the vent back there to so it's out of the way.
 
 

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