Mr. Tee'd (gas line tee)

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Old 11-15-14, 03:52 PM
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Mr. Tee'd (gas line tee)

I have two "tees" on the natural gas line coming into my house... one teed off to a gas light and the other teed off to a gas grill. Both of which are gone.

What remains on the tee is just old style packing nut shut off valves. I like to remove the valves and put a plug in the teed end.

Is that OK to do so?
Or do I have to hire a plumber to completely remvove the tee's?
Is it a bad idea to have plugged ends open in a gas system like that?
 
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Old 11-15-14, 04:28 PM
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Yes go ahead and plug them... use teflon tape on the threads.....
 
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Old 11-16-14, 07:39 AM
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Got a picture?
Got me worryed when you say "old style packing nut shut off valves"
Should have been real valves made for gas.
If you do use Teflon tape it needs to be yellow tape made for gas lines.
Why not going back to where the gas line was run from and cap or plug it there?
 
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Old 11-16-14, 08:32 AM
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I agree with Joe. Or remove the valve and cap it at that point.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 09:40 AM
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Should have been real valves made for gas.
Why not going back to where the gas line was
run from and cap or plug it there?
Don't have a photo handy but its your typical old style gas valve with the nut on one side and the lever on the other. Yes, real valves made for gas... but 50 years ago. Proned to leak I am sure, I don't think tightening the packing nut is a good solution.

The are attached directly to the tee. In order to remove the tee I would have to have a plumber remove about 20' of 1" pipe in the opposite direction... the next closest joint being the gas meter outside.

I guess my only concern here is the plugs in general.... is that considered a "permanent" solution? Is it strange that I would have a pair of plugged tee'ed between my meter and my gas furnace (thinking the gas furnace should always be the first appliance off the main branch??)
 
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Old 11-16-14, 11:11 AM
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The are attached directly to the tee.
That doesn't make sense in the fact that the valves would have a male end vs a female end. Not typical (but possible). Perhaps the valves are attached to tee by close nipple. That notwithstanding (I like using that word ) using a plug is perfectly OK. As stated before use the yellow TFE tape or joint compound and then use the soapy water test.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 12:00 PM
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Hope he uses Teflon pipe dope not joint compound.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 02:03 PM
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Is your valve similar to this image?

[ATTACH=CONFIG]41785[/ATTACH] (Image courtesy of ebay.)

If so, that nut is NOT a packing gland but only hold the tapered plug in the valve. These are what Mike Lawrosa calls "grease valves" because it is the thin layer of grease on the plug that seals the valve from leakage. I would remove these valves and plug the tee. I would use a Teflon paste but not Teflon tape. Other paste type thread sealants are acceptable IF the instructions declare them good for natural gas. Ideally I would use a recessed hex-head plug or a short (not close) nipple with a cap.

Perhaps the valves are attached to tee by close nipple.
Norm, fifty years ago close nipples as well as street elbows and bushings were prohibited in fuel gas piping.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 02:48 PM
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Norm, fifty years ago close nipples as well as street elbows and bushings were prohibited in fuel gas piping.
True, but we have both seen things that should not be. That's why I said it was a bit strange. However, I did not realize that a street ell was not allowed. Thanks for the tip.

And Joe, yea pipe dope not joint compound.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 03:25 PM
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close nipples as well as street elbows and bushings were prohibited in fuel gas piping.
Bushings still not allowed in NJ...

I would use a Teflon paste but not Teflon tape. Other paste type thread sealants are acceptable IF the instructions declare them good for natural gas.
Not sure of the issue here... just use tape IMO
 
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Old 11-16-14, 04:46 PM
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I just don't like Teflon tape for anything but water.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 05:18 PM
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I would not recommend PTFE tape on gas pipe connections. Technically, it is allowed on any NPT threads. (Tapered Pipe Threads) If you do use it, use the Yellow.

Whatever your preference, do not use tape (or dope) on any flare fittings or compression fittings, such as a Gas Range Flex Supply Line.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 05:41 PM
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If you do use it, use the Yellow.
LOL... Let me ask.. what did they do before yellow tape???

Ill have to look in the code again but I see no mention of double density yellow tape for gas pipe...


do not use tape (or dope) on any flare fittings or compression fittings, such as a Gas Range Flex Supply Line.
No tape but I use dope on flare and compression fittings... 30 plus years...

Been using this since I was a kid...

Real Tuff™ | Thread Sealants | Hercules
 
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Old 11-16-14, 05:45 PM
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They used pipe dope. 100+ years and it's always worked.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 06:15 PM
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LOL... Let me ask.. what did they do before yellow tape???
I asked the same question. Been using the white stuff for many years no problem. But The difference is in the price.

But seriously. My understanding is that the white stuff can breakdown with natural gas. So I'm told.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 06:38 PM
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Code IFGC


403.9.3 Thread compounds.

Thread (joint) compounds (pipe dope) shall be resistant to the action of liquefied petroleum gas or to any other chemical constituents of the gases to be conducted through the piping.


Read specs here on tape... Ill challenge any inspector...

PTFE Thread Sealant Tape
 
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Old 11-16-14, 06:58 PM
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"Gas Line Service - Heavy Duty,
Full-Density Yellow Tape for Gas Service"

The above is a quote from web site you referenced Mike. They recommend yellow for gas.
I still say pipe dope is better, and why use tape when dope is available and a proven method?
I didn't mean to start a debate here, I thought it was an accepted fact to use pipe dope on gas threads.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 07:08 PM
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As far as I know (which isn't very far) the ONLY difference between yellow and white Teflon tape is the thickness.

Teflon tape is much cleaner to use BUT if you are not careful about how you wrap the fitting (miss the first two threads) then there is a real possibility of having shards of tape in the system. This could keep a gas valve from fully seating.

That's my reason.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 07:12 PM
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I would agree with Furd.
The tape, especially white, will tend to shred. Yellow will tend to shred less.
Pipe dope does none of the above.
How can I bow out gracefully?
 
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Old 11-16-14, 07:15 PM
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I didn't mean to start a debate here, I thought it was an accepted fact to use pipe dope on gas threads.
No debate...LOL... Actually I use tape on joints 3/4" and smaller. short runs and repairs. Water heater reconnects ect....

I only use tape and paste on larger pipe dia...

I rarely use paste by itself anymore...


Teflon tape is much cleaner to use BUT if you are not careful about how you wrap the fitting (miss the first two threads) then there is a real possibility of having shards of tape in the system. This could keep a gas valve from fully seating.
Most likely correct Joel... I said it before somewhere and IMO colored taped were produced for the homeowner in mind..

IMO the yellow tape may impede the tightening of the joint...

But if anyone finds it in the code I would be happy to use the yellow stuff.. ( Well not really...LOL)
 
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Old 11-16-14, 07:29 PM
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To change the subject
DuPont is on an active campaign to disassociate the company from Teflon Tape.
I guess they never had anything to do with it's production or inventing it??
 
 

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