New kitchen piping

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  #1  
Old 04-20-15, 08:11 PM
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New kitchen piping

In having the piping redone in the kitchen, the contractor has taken me from the before pic [upper] to the after pic [lower] and is now telling me that the plumbing trim out is the responsibility of the customer [me] and will have to be done in order to connect up the new sink/fixtures.

They never mentioned that this extra burden is on the homeowner and, he has 'graciously' offered the services of his plumber to write up a quote if we need the connections and an 'air gap' installed.

- Can someone briefly explain why there are now four pipes rather than two?
- Previously we had hardware installed to turn off the water but my guess is that now we will need a plumber to add those back on
- In the before pic there are two pipes inside the wall -- Are those not needed anymore?
- Approximately what would I be expecting to pay for the connections and 'air gap'?


Will probably have more questions once I have cooled off a bit.

Thanks
 
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Old 04-20-15, 08:16 PM
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I see four stubs for water..... two for hot and two for cold. One hot and one cold are for the sink.

Are you having a dishwasher installed ?
One hot would be for that..... plus an air gap for the drain line.
Not all codes require an air gap for the dishwasher.

Are you having a disposer installed ?
 
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Old 04-20-15, 09:13 PM
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Thanks PJ

Yes, a dishwasher and disposal [planned].

So now I need four shutoff valves to be installed by someone who can sweat pipes?

Wouldn't a simple 'T' connector have served the purpose?

How about the two pipes behind the drywall [upper pic] -- what did those do?
 
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Old 04-20-15, 11:48 PM
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The two dead ended pipes in the wall look like air traps for reducing hammering from rapidly closing faucets or valves.

You need at least three valves installed. I'm not sure what the fourth one on the cold water side is for.
 
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Old 04-21-15, 12:49 AM
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PJ is correct that the old piping visible in the first picture are air chambers, they are to reduce/eliminate water hammer. Trouble is, the simple pipe air chambers eventually (meaning a matter of weeks to months) lose the air cushion because the air is absorbed by the water. When this happens they do nothing.

You do not need to solder the valves in place, simply use compression valves. You would first turn off the water and then use a pipe cutter to cut off the caps. Then add the valves by slipping them over the cut pipe and tightening the nut about one to one and a half turns past hand tight.

BrassCraft 1/2 in. Nominal Compression Inlet x 3/8 in. O.D. Compression Outlet 1/4-Turn Angle Valve-G2CR19X C1 - The Home Depot

HDX Large Diameter Mini Tube Cutter-HDX006 - The Home Depot
 
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Old 04-21-15, 04:46 AM
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IMO he probably put them there for new water hammer arrestors on the two top stubs..



Or this




The other stubs below (hot) you just add a tee and install two valves...Cold commonly gets one unless you have ice maker.
 
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Old 04-21-15, 06:12 AM
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You would need to get a couple of quotes to determine sink hook up prices in your area.
I would say at least $200-$300 or more, plus material. This is just a guess based on my area.
The most expensive parts you need are the valves and strainer basket.

We could walk you through a complete hook up if you're handy and want to do it.

Sounds like you're a little miffed at contractor, but at least it looks like a good job and well done.

Can you post the height from floor of the 1-1/2" ABS pipe and the 2 highest copper stub outs?
 
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Old 04-21-15, 07:13 AM
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We could walk you through a complete hook up if you're handy and want to do it.
Yes, if not for the learning experience [even though, in the end, I may not save any money]

Drain is 14 3/4" above old flooring and upper copper pipes 20 1/2" above.

Would probably go with the compression fittings as Furd suggested [since I don't do blow torches].


note: Though cabinets aren't going in until next week.
 
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Old 04-21-15, 08:27 AM
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Good Deal.
You don't need to do anything until after cabinets are installed, except replace drywall if not already done. Leave everything as is.
It's looks like you may have had old cast iron drain pipes or galvanized. Once new sink connections are complete you will see a noticeable improvement in drain flow and clogs will be greatly reduced.
 
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