Broke PVC drain pipe. Now what?

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-23-15, 10:03 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 34
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Broke PVC drain pipe. Now what?

Name:  IMG_20150523_214037636.jpg
Views: 1037
Size:  22.9 KB

So, you can probably see what's happened here. The 4" pipe is my main vent stack. The broke fitting goes to a 2" washing machine drain pipe.

My thoughts were to cut the 4" fitting out altogether and replace with an identical fitting, and join it all together with rubber boots. I'd probably have to attach short lengths of 4" pipe to the top and bottom of the new fitting for something for the boot to attach to, and maybe use a pvc coupling where I can.

(the black wrap on the existing pipe is just for sound dampening, in case you're wondering)

I'm not a plumber but I see no reason why this wouldn't be ok, but I'm wondering . . . is it ok by code to use rubber boots on the main vent stack?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 05-23-15, 10:11 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,398
Received 1,400 Votes on 1,297 Posts
Originally I thought the pipe just became disconnected but on further review I see the fitting cracked. I'll defer to Brian for the repair.
 
  #3  
Old 05-23-15, 10:13 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, It's OK. You have a solid plan and you already know you need to glue short pieces of pipe into the fitting to add the boots. Take some careful measurements to fit new piece.

Use No-Hub Couplers as pictured below, do not use the flexible:

Name:  nohub.JPG
Views: 261
Size:  9.7 KB

Cut out fitting, keeping cuts as square as possible. Attach no-hubs to top and bottom of cut pipe. Slide jackets away to allow rubber to be folded back and new fitting inserted.

Replace metal jackets and tighten to 60 inch pounds.
 
  #4  
Old 05-23-15, 10:48 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 36 Votes on 28 Posts
Rather than cut out and replace all that 4-inch plastic I would buy (or rent) a 2-inch RamBit and just cut out the 2-inch fitting. Replace the broken 2-inch as needed and you are all done.

https://www.plumbingsupply.com/rambi...aver-tool.html

If you do choose to use the rubber couplings mind well Handyone's advice to use the ones with the stainless steel shield. The rubber only ones are only used with buried piping.
 
  #5  
Old 05-29-15, 04:35 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 34
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Fixed it

Thanks for the advice folks.

I was actually able to remove the broken fitting with a heat gun. Just heated the inner (broken) fitting until it became flexible which broke the bond, and used a pair of needle-nose pliers to twirl it out like a wet noodle. Good as new.

Here is where I found how to do it:
Check it out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DGRKMfUbwQ

Saved me plenty time and aggravation. Apparently a hair dryer works too.
 
  #6  
Old 05-29-15, 07:03 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,721
Received 314 Votes on 282 Posts
The Ram-Bit is a new one on me. Very interesting. I wonder if it can be used on a toilet flange.
The heat gun is also inter testing but I hope it doesn't degrade the fitting for early failure.
 
  #7  
Old 05-30-15, 08:10 AM
Z
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,309
Received 35 Votes on 34 Posts
I have to defer to the guys that know there stuff here, but Iím just wondering if that is actually a good method. Maybe I missed it but why does that guy in the video want to reuse fittings? Or did he say something about convenience of not having to go shop for new fittings in an emergency or something like that?

I would think that to reuse any of the PVC you would have to clean it somehow down to the pristine PVC, that is clean it down to material that hasnít already reacted with the solvent. I would think maybe reaming with a tool would (or could?) do that, but if solvent is re-applied to surface(s) that have already reacted with the solvent, I wonder what kind of bonding you really get? My understanding is that the solvent causes a molecular bonding between the PVC surfaces that is just as strong as the actual PVC pipe itself. But what do you get if you reapply solvent to surfaces that have already had the solvent applied?

Maybe it is OK, but I would have questions. Just my opinion.
 
  #8  
Old 05-30-15, 08:34 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 36 Votes on 28 Posts
I haven't watched the video just yet (Australian accents have a tendency to irritate me) but the ability to remove one pipe from a installation could save many fittings as well as hours of rework.

While the bonding of the two pieces of plastic (whatever their composition) may be at the molecular level the molecules themselves do not change. The solvent cement is merely a solvent that will melt the material that has the same (or similar) material melted into it to make a syrupy concoction that first softens the plastic fitting/pipe and then as the solvent evaporates the included material first gels and then hardens to a homogenous mass with the pipe and fitting.

Here is a little experiment to try. Take some MEK (Methyl Ethyl Ketone) in a metal can and add bits of expanded polystyrene like packing peanuts or cheap ice chests. Stir it up and continue to add the poly until you get a thick syrup. Coat anything with the syrup and let it harden. You will have a hard plastic coat even though the original material was quite soft. Add a bit of black ABS plastic to the syrup and stir it up and you will have black plastic syrup.

Another experiment. If you need to glue two pieces of acrylic plastic (Plexiglas) make the seam as smooth as possible without actually getting a polished edge and clamp them together. Dip a screwdriver or small diameter pointed rod into the MEK and then run the point over the seam. The MEK will be drawn in by capillary action and you will have a strongly glued joint. If you need to glue to sheets together on the flats then use an eyedropper to make a puddle of MEK on one surface and then press the other surface to the first.
 
  #9  
Old 05-30-15, 10:50 AM
Z
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,309
Received 35 Votes on 34 Posts
At the 6 minute mark he talks about reusing the one inch fitting he holds in his hand and shows how to remove the pipe stubs from that fitting using heat. I just canít see any emergency that would necessitate that. I would go buy a new fitting unless I lived a real long way from a supply. But maybe he is just trying to demonstrate how to remove stubs from a fitting and doesnít really mean he would want to reuse a particular fitting after it has been removed. But I donít think he makes that clear.

I think he does mention somewhere that he is doing this for pipes that are not under high pressure implying that makes a difference (At least I think he does, my audio has problems), so maybe that does make a difference.

This is a very interesting topic (you find some really strange thinking out there about this on various web sites, lol) but I found this take on it from Richard Trethewey of ThisOldHouse and a method he suggests:

Ungluing PVC | Plumbing | Plumbing, HVAC & Electrical | This Old House
 
  #10  
Old 05-30-15, 02:04 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 36 Votes on 28 Posts
I agree that removing stubs just so you can re-use a fitting is silly. I see it like spending a dollar for a claw tool so you can recover a nickel.

As for Richard Trethewey, I have no respect at all for his being a "master" plumber. He may very well hold the license in his home state of Massachusetts but I would not be surprised to learn that he first obtained it under methods that are not entirely honest. I have seen him do (and not do) too many things over the years to actually think of him as being anything more than just a mediocre plumber at best.

He was born in 1956 so that makes him six years younger than me, or 59 years old this year. He started with TOH in 1979 or when he was 23 years old. In 1990 (34 years old) he started RST, inc., a manufacturer's representative business and that is still where he is today. Assuming that his business is viable he has been outside the day-to-day pluming world for some 25 years. Also assuming that he only worked in the trade (really worked and not just accompanied his father in the field) after his 18th birthday and up to his founding of his company it would mean a plumbing career of about 16 years.

I've watched TOH pretty regularly since the early 1980s and ATOH since its inception. I have NEVER seen him de-burr the inside of a copper tube before soldering. I have regularly seen him use pipe-thread compound on flared, compression and o-ring joints as well as slip joints of DWV fittings. His use of pliers instead of a proper wrench in so many cases sickens me. I remember one episode of TOH, way back when Bob Vila was still host and he was installing some plastic DWV piping. He cut the pipe with a carpenter's hand saw and then glued it up. (This was before the code required the use of a plastic primer.) Bob mentioned that it looked pretty easy and a homeowner should be able to do and Richard immediately blurted out, "Oh, no! You have to be licensed to do this." Well, maybe in Taxachusetts which seems like it never met a regulation that it didn't like, as long as it brought in money, but in most areas a homeowner may indeed do plumbing work on his own house without being a licensed plumber.

Now don't get me wrong, I find him to be an interesting person and I think he is an asset to the program, much more than Kevin O'Conner, but his expertise as a plumber is no more than mine.

Just my opinion.

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/biog...420039,00.html

http://rstthermal.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Trethewey
 
  #11  
Old 05-30-15, 02:40 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,721
Received 314 Votes on 282 Posts
Furd,
Can you comment on using the Rambit or even the heat method for a toilet flange? I may need that process in the future. Just thinking ahead.
 
  #12  
Old 05-30-15, 02:41 PM
Z
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,309
Received 35 Votes on 34 Posts
Well show biz is a special world (lol) but it looks like he is not totally ignorant :

How to Cut and Solder Copper Pipe | Video | This Old House
 
  #13  
Old 05-30-15, 03:18 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 36 Votes on 28 Posts
Well, I never stated he is ignorant but that ATOH shop video notwithstanding I have never seen him ream the copper tubing/pipe when doing a job in the field.


Norm, I still haven't watched the video concerning removing plastic pipe with the use of heat nor have I ever tried to do so. I have never used a RamBit either but I have seen them in the old time family run hardware store near me. It looks like a tool that could be a bit difficult to use, needing a really slow speed on the drill motor and the ability to hold it really steady by the user. Still, I think I would try the RamBit before the heat trick. Maybe I can do some experimentation over the next week or so on the heat technique and report back.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: