Need flexible connector between hose bib & PVC

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Old 08-06-15, 01:02 PM
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Need flexible connector between hose bib & PVC

Need a better flexible connector between a brass Y shutoff & the Sch. 40 PVC - w/o spending a fortune.
* Pic shows a brass adapter - 3/4 hose thread x 1/2 FPT, screwed on one side of Y shutoff. The PVC supplies another faucet in front yard.
* Tried these cheap Orbit flex risers - they leak - even w/ lots of thick teflon. Don't know if they're made for this.

Before, I measured / cut exact fit using hard PVC & fittings (for the old Y shutoff). Time consuming & difficult to remove Y shutoff to replace washers (or replace shutoff). Replaced Y shutoff - not same size as old one.

Maybe something like "flexible polyethylene riser" - says they glue to std. PVC fittings?
http://www.lowes.com/pd_234494-74985...d=3425346&pl=1

Need a bit of flexibility - from the PCV to the brass adapter (# 1 in pic). To allow unscrewing adapter [# 1] from shutoff.

I can shorten / lengthen the sch 40 PVC stubbing up (if needed), and / or change the PVC end fitting. The PVC turns horizontal ~ 12" - 14" underground.

Thanks.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 01:42 PM
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Just make up a short section of garden hose. Replacement hose end fittings are available at most home and garden centers. Just cut up an old hose and make a short new one the length you need. If a direct piece 6" long puts too much pressure on the fittings or the hose wants to kink just use a longer piece and form it into a loop.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 03:32 PM
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Thanks. I considered that (after I posted).
Note: The end of PVC (as of now) is NOT above ground level (pic may be deceiving). I could extend it.

As you mentioned, that puts the PVC pretty close to the end of the Y shut off (have to measure exact distance).

But, using garden hose & w/ PVC fitting just above grd level, the 3/4 HT x 1/2 PT adapter - now attached to Y shutoff - would go away.
But, have to use a different adapter - to go from 1/2 PVC coupling to 3/4" HT.

Like: Shop Watts 3/4-in x 1/2-in Threaded Adapter Fitting at Lowes.com

Don't know how well / long brass adapters (of this type / quality) last, being buried?
Or, whether it's a good idea to bury one end of garden hose connection (w/ only a rubber washer making it water tight) vs. actual potable water plumbing connections.

Someone mentioned, possibly needing a vacuum breaker / anti siphon valve, where the at the bib, near where the PVC gets buried.
To prevent siphoning back into the house.

Not sure?
The PVC only supplies another above grd water faucet (not part of any underground irrigation).

So I don't know if that's any different than any other hose bib / garden hose, tied directly to the home plumbing?

If one of the (buried) connections in this setup allowed ground water into the system, that might be a concern (or not).
This bib is the lowest valve / outlet in the house (by far).

Only if city water pressure was halted, could siphoning from this buried PVC go back into the house.
Up until now (w/ all hard PVC pipe / connections), it's seems like any other part of the plumbing system. But, maybe it would violate some code?
 
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Old 08-06-15, 10:01 PM
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Pilot Dane, remembered - garden hose isn't rated constant pressure (esp. in hot sun).
This has turned out to be harder than I figured to find the right product.

Maybe a higher psi rate poly pipe w/ some barbed fittings & SS clamps?
Finding 80 psi or > poly pipe in small quantities is tough.

Maybe nobody would notice 1 ft off a roll.
Couple of irrigation supply places near - maybe will cut me 1 -2 ft of the "right stuff."
 
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Old 08-07-15, 05:53 AM
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Keep in mind that none of what you are doing is "up to code" or "proper". You've got "code" and "proper" disappearing in the rear view mirror.

Do I agree with that approach... no. You've gone through much of the hard work of burying the water line and setting up your systems. You have spent a lot of time already trying to solve this problem of how to hook everything up to one outside spigot and you have a Band-Aid system at best. And you have lost the easy use of that spigot and created the risk of bursting pipes inside your home if you forget and leave that crap connected during a freeze. If you bought a cheap 16" masonry bit (Harbor Freight sells them in the lower 48 for $20 for a set of five bits) you could bore through your foundation you tie into the water inside where it's better protected against freezing, gives you the opportunity to meet code, and provides a more professional solution that may increase your home's value when it comes time to sell.
 
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Old 08-07-15, 11:57 AM
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Thanks. Not sure where / exactly how you mean to bore thru the slab foundation ? to tie onto water lines inside the wall? (in relation to hose bibb in the pic).

Bore a hole vertically - the thickness of slab's perimeter footing?
Cut out sheet rock inside, then bring a line (PVC) up * thru * the slab footing, tying onto copper inside the wall? Holy cow.

Unless that's not what you meant at all, then tying onto the PVC supply - from meter to house - might be less intensive. Diagonally across frt yard - snaking way around trees; over / under giant roots. Not cutting so many roots, it kills trees (seen it many times).

Either method (or anything close), I'd have to hire most of it done. Mentally, I can handle most anything; physically... no.

You're talking major work (I think) for a faucet - only to water grass.
Before I went to massive effort methods, I'd just put another gate in the fence at frt corner of the house, then run garden hose from the bibb in the pic (which is on side of house, in exact middle).
 
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Old 08-07-15, 12:12 PM
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If you want to do it you can bore through the slab at an angle. Most tool rental stores (if you're close to one of the bigger cities) have hammer drills you can rent. I dig a hole outside where I think it will emerge then bore from the inside angling down so that the hole emerges below grade as deeply as possible. A cardboard template can help work out the geometry and serve as a guide so you know the angle to hold the drill. With a 1" diameter hole you can get a 3/4" water line through.

If you don't want to go to that trouble. What you're doing outside doesn't meet code but you're in a odd gray/redneck area. You're doing a temporary water connection in a semi-permanent manner. If you're worried about a vacuum breaker or anti siphon feature you have several options. Most difficult would be to replace your sillcock with a frost proof one and most include an anti-siphon device. Or they sell ones that you can screw onto your existing spigot.
 
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Old 08-07-15, 03:21 PM
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Re: screw on vacuum breakers (to hose bibb). Info on these may be helpful, regardless of what else I do.
Can you confirm if those types are rated / designed for any type constant pressure? I read (unofficial) that ones screwed to outside spigot aren't.
If talking ones like:
Shop AMERICAN VALVE 3/4-in Brass Male In-Line Vacuum Breaker at Lowes.com

I might be interested in them for other "normal" hose bibbs (which wouldn't be constant press).

* But for the spigot supplied (now) by the underground PVC, I'd assume the V.B. needs to be at the faucet shown in the orig. pic (not at the remote faucet, in frt yd)?
If so, that side of the Y shutoff is always open - constant press. to the frt yd faucet.

Yes, boring thru the slab & the rest - lots of work. Though it may meet code. What if you hit rebar ?

If I ditched my current "setup" (what ever reason), I'd install a gate in the cross fence @ the front of house.
Then run ~ 20+ ft of extra garden hose, from the side of house spigot. Seems easier than boring the slab method.

It's always been a fixed cross fence on that side of the house - no access / gate - from the frt yd to that side of house.
That's why I tied onto the spigot - to get a faucet outside the fence.
 
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Old 08-08-15, 06:15 AM
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Generally nothing that attaches to a hose bib or spigot is "approved" for constant pressure. By definition the outdoor spigot and anything that attaches to it is for temporary use only.

Personally I would not bother with a vacuum breaker but it's cheap and easy insurance if you do put one on. As far as code is concerned, if you have codes, your sillcock is probably grandfathered in under the codes in affect when the house was built so it is probably not required. If you install a screw on vacuum breaker I would remove the locking screw so you can remove or replace it if it ever develops a leak. The screw is designed to break off flush when you tighten it. So, once you tighten the set screw and it snaps off the vacuum breaker can't be removed. If it fails or leaks you may have to replace the entire sillcock.
 
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