AAV vents--deal breaker?

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Old 08-19-15, 07:54 AM
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AAV vents--deal breaker?

I'm house shopping and my current front-runner is a recently updated 1947 lakefront home. House shows well with great location, good floorplan & lots of quality improvements. The presence of Studor vents in the basement kitchenette and bath makes me wonder if there might be hidden problems. These vents generally get no love on this forum but are they enough of a problem to be a deal breaker on buying a home? The upstairs has been changed to cathedral ceilings so this limits my options to run vent stacks to the roof.
 
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Old 08-19-15, 08:24 AM
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I don't know if it's a deal breaker but it may indicate that the downstairs work is not up to code. You just have to look the property over closely or have a competent home inspection so you know what you are getting.
 
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Old 08-19-15, 08:46 AM
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As a note, as posted here a home inspection does not necessarily look for code violations. That surprised me. The vent issue can be corrected at some cost, but I agree with PD it may indicate work done without a permit or inspection.

You can check the local appropriate office to see what has been pulled for permits and you can hire your own inspector, specifically making sure s/he is working for you and will investigate code compliance.

Bud
 
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Old 08-19-15, 07:52 PM
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As long as AAVs are code approved in the jurisdiction where the house is located, AND they are installed in a code-approved manner, I would not be the least bit hesitant about buying the house because of this sole item.

It IS true that natural venting is preferable but AAVs ARE used in many jurisdictions without any problems. They MUST be located in an area where they can be replaced if/when necessary and not sealed inside a wall.
 
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Old 08-20-15, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Furd
They MUST be located in an area where they can be replaced if/when necessary and not sealed inside a wall.
Well the only ones I know about were the ones I could see

They just don't seem like a good idea in a basement.
 
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Old 08-20-15, 05:05 PM
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In 1945 that old a camp may or may not have even had indoor plumbing.
Highly likely that basement work was done DIY, no permits.
I'd be hiring a real plumber to do the inspection on the plumbing, if there's a question, not a weekend course "home inspector".
If this is a realitor home inspector, pass and hire your own.
He will have your interest in mind to where his next check is coming from.
 
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Old 08-22-15, 07:18 AM
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I agree with hiring a plumber to inspect what's there. But I think AAVs get a bad rap. I wouldn't do an entire house with them (though that would be legal here) but they're quite useful in situations where a traditional vent would be difficult or impossible. Like an island with a sink, or, in my case, a kitchen sink against the outside wall of a log house.
 
 

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