Replacing the shut off on a vertical valve?

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Old 12-23-15, 10:00 PM
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Replacing the shut off on a vertical valve?

I am remodeling my half bath. I was able to successfully replace the shut off valves for my sink with 1/4 turn angle valves. It was pretty easy, I used the type where I could put teflon tape on the pipe and simply screw the shut off right on the pipe. Now I am trying to get the toilet out but it has a different type of shut off installed. It kind of looks like there is a square connector going to the pipe. Then the shut off connects to that. I tried to get pictures but it's tough given the space. My only guess is they used this type of shut off for space reasons. I was hoping I could install a 1/4 angle valve like my others but I'm a little scared to try to unscrew the current valve. I want to be sure it wasn't soldered on or something. If I break the pipe trying to remove this shut off I will be in big trouble! Any ideas? Thanks!

This is the shut off I was planning to put on..
BrassCraft 3/8 in. FIP Inlet x 3/8 in. O.D. Compression Outlet 1/4-Turn Angle Valve-G2R15X C1 - The Home Depot

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Last edited by PJmax; 12-23-15 at 10:26 PM. Reason: enhanced pictures
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Old 12-23-15, 10:29 PM
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I brightened up your pictures.

It looks like that piece is a right angle fitting that screws on the pipe in the wall. That pipe could also be 1/2". The problem here is if you take the angle piece off.... is your new valve going to fit in there with the hose on it ?
 
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Old 12-23-15, 10:48 PM
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I think it will fit. I held the new 1/4 turn angle valve against the wall to see. The hose to the toilet would come out at the top of the new valve so I think it would work but I can't say for sure. I was also hoping a new toilet may be a bit smaller so that may help too. Would a better option be to just leave the angle fitting and plug a new shut off into it? I took a quick look at Home Depot but didn't see one that looked like what I currently have. Maybe I didn't look hard enough.
 
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Old 12-23-15, 11:02 PM
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You could duplicate what is there using a new 1/4 turn valve. That top nut where it connects to the angle fitting is a compression fitting. You can unscrew that and the short piece of pipe will come right out.

Looking again.... you can probably just disconnect the lower compression nut at the top of the valve. Remove the valve and reconnect the new one there.

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Old 12-24-15, 07:21 AM
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I actually just thought of something. As you saw in my drywall post, I still need to get the part of the drywall down that's surrounding that incoming pipe so I can replace it! It had tile all over it so there's glue everywhere. I'm probably going to be forced to remove that angle fitting for now, otherwise how would I ever cut the drywall to fit around it (there would be a huge hole!). I'm also going to want to get that nasty escutcheon replaced! What are your thoughts on me removing the angle piece all together and just throwing on a shark bite cap on pipe until I get the new drywall up? I've heard mixed things on shark bites but when I refinished my other bathroom I used them temporarily when I was in a similar situation. Once that's done I could assess my options and either connect the 1/4 turn valve directly to the pipe or put the angle valve back on and attach as you suggested. I'd hate to put the new valve on and then have to immediately remove it when I put up new drywall. You've already been a huge help! I'm happy I have somewhere to go to get advice before I just take a shot at something and risk damage!
 
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Old 12-24-15, 07:31 AM
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Would a better option be to just leave the angle fitting and plug a new shut off into it
Yes, and Pete found the perfect valve for this.
The valve is a 3/8" female compression inlet x 3/8" compression outlet straight angle stop.

To install, remove the very top compression nut from the right angle adapter and attach new valve.

These valves are available at big blue, I would special order if need be, or check plumbing supply store.

Edit/added: You can remove the angle fitting, but the pipe is not copper tube and you can't use quick connects, it's 1/2" pipe.
So cap off the pipe with a 1/2" pipe cap (tape and a little pipe dope).
Cut off the escutcheon before removing the angle adapter and be certain pipe in wall does not turn while you're removing the adapter.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 09:14 AM
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It's never easy, is it? Thanks for the additional tips. Every other pipe in the house I've messed with has been 3/8". Is the pipe going to the toilet typically bigger? Are you saying the pipe coming out of the wall is 1/2" and the angle fitting is a 1/2" on one side and 3/8" on the other? I'm comfortable with the kind of shut off you screw on (using teflon tape over the pipe) and I should be OK with a compression fitting. I am not comfortable soldering though.

Do I need something like this?
1/2 in. Black Malleable Iron Cap-521-403HN - The Home Depot

Do I still put teflon tape over the 1/2" pipe coming out of the wall before I screw on the cap? I haven't used pipe dope before. Does that take place of the teflon tape?

Something like this?

RectorSeal T Plus 2 4 oz. Teflon Pipe-Thread Sealant-23631 - The Home Depot

Sorry for the novice questions. I have a feeling I won't tackle this until after Christmas though. I don't want to get into it and find out I have a wrong part and every store is closed. Unfortunately this bathroom doesn't have a shutoff in the basement, I'd have to leave the main turned off if I ran into serious problems.

Thanks again guys.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 09:33 AM
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The link is correct, that's a 1/2" pipe cap. Get the galvanized instead of the black.
Also purchase a 3/8" cap in case I'm wrong about the size.

Remove the angle adapter, clean the pipe threads, apply 3 - 4 turns of tape to the male threads from wall and install cap.
The dope is optional, I always apply a little. The dope you linked to is excellent and is available in a small tube.
The most important thing is don't let the pipe coming from wall turn while you're working on it.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 09:53 AM
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This sounds like something I can handle. I am concerned about removing the angle piece though. Just getting off the shutoffs under the sink was a HUGE pain. I soaked them in WD-40 multiple times and even let it set over night. It still took me a good 30 minutes to finally get them to turn so I could remove the old ones. I fear removing the angle adapter will be just as difficult (if not more). I used 16" channellock pliers for the sink shut offs.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ilpage_o00_s00

Would this same tool work to remove the angle adapter? Maybe I should keep soaking it in WD-40 over the holidays. You also mentioned I should cut off the escutcheon first. Any tips on doing that?

Are there any other precautions I should take to avoid twisting the pipe? That would really be a disaster!
 
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Old 12-24-15, 10:00 AM
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Just in case it's not 1/2" ..... pickup a 3/8" cap too. You can always return it.

The WD-40 won't aid in loosening it. You'd need Liquid Wrench or PB blaster.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 10:40 AM
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Cut off the escutcheon with tin snips, or just keep twisting it with pliers until the metal breaks.

You are replacing the drywall. Cap the pipe after toilet is removed. Step one:
- Knock a huge hole in the wall
- You can then back up the pipe in wall with a pipe wrench while you remove the adapter with an adjustable wrench. (I don't use adjustable pliers on plumbing fittings, less leverage)
 
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Old 12-24-15, 11:04 AM
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I am removing the drywall so good point HandyOne! Alright well it sounds like I've got some supplies to pick up after the holidays. Thanks again for all the help, you guys are great. Hope you both have a great Christmas! I'll report back when I get around to attempting this, it may be a week or two. Take care!
 
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Old 12-29-15, 03:43 PM
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I was able to make it to the hardware store and get the necessary cap, I got a 1/2" and a 3/8" galvanized to be safe. I figured I'd give it a shot today. I got the toilet out relatively easy but didn't have much luck with the adapter. I sprayed it down with PB Blaster and tried to remove it. Literally didn't even budge. I only let the PB Blaster soak a few minutes so maybe I should keep saturating it and letting it sit. I also didn't have a regular wrench big enough to fit over the pipe so I tried using 2 crescent adjustable wrenches. Maybe that was causing a problem too however I didn't see the pipe in the wall move around at all. I will need to dig up my small pipe wrench; maybe that will make it easier to get the adapter off. It's already almost 7 pm so I decided to stop for the night. I didn't want to run into an emergency and have the hardware store be closed. I guess I'll keep spraying PB Blaster on the adapter and pipe and try again tomorrow using my pipe wrench and crescent wrench.

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Last edited by SamAlex; 12-29-15 at 04:35 PM.
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Old 12-29-15, 04:34 PM
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I recommend you knock out at least a little of the tile around the pipe so you can see in there.

Purchase a new 1/2" pipe nipple, length of old one.
Shut off main house water and drain pipes.
With the water off, you can remove the adapter and if the pipe comes out with it (or rotates at all), install new nipple and cap. Wrap tape on male threads and I like to put a little pipe dope on top of the tape.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 09:58 AM
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Good idea removing the tiles. That allowed me to get a pipe wrench over the nipple piece coming out of the wall. Surprisingly the threads were almost like new once I got the adapter off. I used a wire brush to remove the remains of the old teflon tape and applied some new on it. I didn't do the pipe dope this time because I will (hopefully) be removing the cap in a month or so to install a shut off. I'll put the pipe dope on at that time. No leaks so far, so I think I'm good. I'm sure I'll have more questions as I get into the project but I'm good to keep moving forward. Thanks for all your help!Name:  finalcap.jpg
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