Compression or Sharkbite inside the wall?


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Old 01-21-16, 08:09 AM
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Compression or Sharkbite inside the wall?

Handyman caused many issues in my girl's place. Ready to tackle some of the plumbing now. I need to extend the lines for my bathroom sink and toilet by about an inch, as the valves are currently occupying the same place as the drywall. My plan is to cut the pipe, then use either a compression or sharkbite connection to extend the needed distance. I have no experience sweating copper. Since the connection will not be accessible when finished, what type of fitting would be best?
 
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Old 01-21-16, 09:19 AM
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Best would be to sweat on a fitting and section of pipe. Probably my number two choice would be a compression fitting though I have never used one in a location where it's not accessible as they can sometimes leak. Then the Sharkbite would be my last choice. They are easy to use and can seal well but I don't like using them where there may be strain or movement on the fitting as I've had them leak when a side or bending force is applied which might happen with opening and closing a shutoff valve.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 10:02 AM
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I have no experience sweating copper
I had never done it before either but after watching a few videos and a little practice it will become quite easy and very rewarding, just don't forget to use flux.

On house water lines I had good luck with Oatey tinning flux (some here will disagree) but it worked fine for me.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 10:17 AM
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The best fix is to open up the wall and solder in new copper stub outs. With the stub outs you can turn the water back on and inspect for leaks before covering with drywall. The stub outs are cut and valves installed after drywall repair.

My second choice would be sharkbites. They won't be used to extend the line out though. You will open the wall, cut off the copper elbows, and use sharkbite 90 elbows to install your new stub outs to avoid soldering.

If you've never sweated copper, especially in close quarters, you can rely on the sharkbites. They are approved for a reason.

The sharkbites are approved for in-wall use.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 02:54 PM
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Handyone and Pilot Dane, it seems you disagree on your second choices. Is that just personal preference?

Handyone, why use elbows instead of a straight connection? I have back to back bathrooms with 8 to 10 inches between sheets of drywall so there is plenty of room for a straight connection inside the wall.

These fittings seem the easiest to use, if they are safe for inside the wall:
http://www.menards.com/main/plumbing...25359535549834
http://www.menards.com/main/plumbing...25359535549834
 
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Old 01-21-16, 03:07 PM
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it seems you disagree on your second choices
No compression fittings are allowed in walls in any jurisdictions AFAIK. Even if they were, you wouldn't want to use them.

Elbows are NOT needed, I'm wrong. You have plenty of space to extend pipe out, I was thinking close quarters.

Be aware, these fittings will allow pipe to rotate, that is normal.
The fittings you linked to are fine, but I would use genuine Sharkbite fittings, that's just me.
If your fittings are warranted for say 25 years, go for it.
 
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Old 01-22-16, 09:55 AM
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Just to throw in another opinion, I would suggest you go the SharkBite route. Learning to solder on old pipes in a confined space is guaranteed to turn into a nightmarish project. I do recommend you take some time to learn to sweat pipes, but I wouldn't start with this project.

I don't see any issue with using SharkBite fittings in the wall as long as the pipes are secured and not flopping around.

Like Handyone, I wouldn't use a compression fitting in the wall.
 
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Old 01-29-16, 06:10 PM
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Another vote for Sharkbites..... Just like some others here, I did learn to sweat the pipes on youtube and it wasn't so hard.... HOWEVER...whenever I do anything at my place (and that's the only time I do any plumbing) - I prefer sharkbites.... they do cost more money but they are so easy AND quick.... by the time you get your torch I am done making the connection.
 
 

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