Sweating copper - how close can fittings be

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Old 02-10-16, 04:45 PM
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Sweating copper - how close can fittings be

What's the safe distance to sweat fittings on copper that you may want to do in stages? Example if I have some short runs and I'm working on a few 90s relatively close to each other what would be the distance that I would have to consider where I would have to sweat them all at once instead of doing one letting it cool them doing the other close to it and letting the original one heat back up again...or is this not an issue and I'm just worrying?
 
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Old 02-10-16, 05:17 PM
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I've read the question several times and don't even know what you're asking... so yeah I think you are just worrying.

There may be a few instances where you want to put something together and sweat it on a bench... but generally, if you have cleaned both ends of the pipe and both ends of the fittings and have put Flux on everything, there is almost no limit to how much you can put together and sweat at one time. Once the pipe gets hot it usually makes sense to keep going... instead of starting and stopping. You are only limited by gravity, so if you are worried something may want to fall apart (gravity) that would be something you would want to sweat separately.

If a piece gets heated up and you don't solder it, (like the end of a pipe you plan on continuing) it's best to clean the end again and put new Flux on it before continuing in that direction.

If you care to elaborate, it might help us understand why you are worrying.
 
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Old 02-10-16, 05:23 PM
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I almost always use PEX not copper and in you area I would never use copper, but why does it need to be done in stages?
If there to close heating one up is gong to loosen up the one next to it.
 
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Old 02-10-16, 09:26 PM
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Sorry for being a bit unclear.

Basically I have an area I need to do a few joints and I was going to prepare ahead of time and solder some of the pieces together with Stubbs about 6 inch long sticking out to solder on the connection to my existing feeds later on. I was just concerned if heating up the stub when I go to join it in later will affect the quality of my pre soldered joint if it heats up again later since it's pretty close.
 
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Old 02-10-16, 09:27 PM
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It will be fine..........................
 
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Old 02-11-16, 03:53 AM
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You should be fine but if worried just put a damp rag over the finished fitting. Will prevent fitting from heating up to much.
 
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Old 02-11-16, 06:31 AM
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As Pugsi says. I've done this multiple times with no problems.
 
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Old 02-11-16, 08:42 AM
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There's no real concern here, but you might want to use MAPP gas instead of propane.

The MAPP gas will heat the joint faster than propane.
 
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Old 02-11-16, 04:34 PM
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Thanks everyone for the input, much appreciated
 
 

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