Should I turn the main water line valve back on

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Old 10-08-16, 03:45 PM
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Thumbs up Should I turn the main water line valve back on

I shut off my mainline water valve before I left my house to avoid the hurricane Matthew hit. After two days, I came back. My mainline water valve is still off. But I got water slowly dripping into my washer machine's drum. And overflew to the floor in the past two days.

I will deal with the wash machine later. But should I turn on my mainline valve of water now? Is it safe to do it?
 
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Old 10-08-16, 04:14 PM
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Old 10-08-16, 04:59 PM
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My first thought was that your water main valve was not totally shut off and may be worn. But you also shut off the washer supply valves. Chances of all valves being bad are slim. Could be washer shut off valves are bad and pressure may be leaking by from water already in the pipes and hoses.
 
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Old 10-08-16, 05:06 PM
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I can't see where turning the water supply and main valve back on will do any damage or harm. But it will most likely mask any reason why it has water going through it now.
 
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Old 10-08-16, 05:25 PM
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No clue how that would have happened, so shut off the supply lines to the washer and cut the main back on the main.
 
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Old 10-08-16, 05:33 PM
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Here is a possible answer. Sometimes solenoid-operated water valves, the water inlet valves for the washing machine, need a certain amount of pressure to close. IF you have leaking shut-off valves there could be a minimal amount of water continually being fed to the piping system in the house.

OR, if you have a multi-story house AND you did not fully drain all the water from the piping by opening a valve in the basement then the water coming into the washing machine MIGHT be from the piping in the upper areas.

I would suggest turning on the main water valve while someone else checks throughout the house. The water will make a noise at the main valve until the pipes are filled and the pressure equalizes and will then be silent. Sort of a large whoosh at first gradually tapering off to silence. If it does NOT stop with the whooshing then close the main valve as you have a serious leak (or an open faucet) somewhere. After it stops making noise go to the upper faucets and one by one open each faucet to bleed out the air, working your way down the house through each faucet. Don't forget to do the toilets(s) by removing the tank lid and holding the float down manually until it stops spitting air.

Then go ahead and open the washing machine shut-off valves and run the machine to get it to purge the air. I suspect that everything will be okay but always be prepared to run back to the main valve if you get a gusher.
 
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Old 10-08-16, 06:04 PM
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Furd, I think you nailed it. I turned on the main valve (I don't have a valve to the washer itself), the leak stops right away. Then I went to upstairs of my two-story house. Open the faucets, there are air coming out from each of them. The toilet seems not having much air though.

In the future, if I want to shut off the main valve, should I always drain the water out from the lowest level? ( I shut off the main valve before, this didn't happen thought).
 
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Old 10-08-16, 07:00 PM
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Here is a possible answer. Sometimes solenoid-operated water valves, the water inlet valves for the washing machine, need a certain amount of pressure to close.
Furd is absolutely correct. Water pressure is needed for the valves to fully shut off. The same thing goes for ice maker valves.

I would doubt there is enough water in the pipes to cause the washer to overflow so there really shouldn't be any need to drain the lines.

I'm curious about the water heater leaking. Is that from the T&P valve on the side of the tank ?
 
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Old 10-09-16, 05:01 PM
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Pjmax, I only turned off one valve, which is the mainline water valve. I pushed the bypass of the water softener. That's all I did. I didn't touch any valve on washer or water heater..
 
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