repair leaking coupling in 3" PVC

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  #1  
Old 11-04-16, 11:32 AM
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repair leaking coupling in 3" PVC

Hi, I have a 3" PVC drain line that runs across my basement. There is a coupling in the line that has started to leak. My question is whether there is a "slip" type coupling for PVC like there is for smaller copper lines. It would be a huge hassle to get either end of the line loose so I can get clearance to splice in a short section and use regular couplings. I know I can use a fernco type rubber coupling on one end of the repair section, but I'd like to use PVC couplings if there's a way to do it. Any ideas?

Thanks, Steve
 
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Old 11-04-16, 12:06 PM
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There are in fact coupling made for that large of pipe. But you need to cut the pipe no matter what to accommodate the new fitting. You might want to try a compression coupling.

This type

3618 - Matco-Norca 3618 - 3" PVC Compression Coupling (400T10)
 
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Old 11-04-16, 12:18 PM
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Great idea, didn't know they existed! Thanks, Steve
 
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Old 11-04-16, 01:18 PM
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A repair like this is done with banded/jacketed no-hub couplings.
Cut out a section of pipe and place a no-hub on each end. Loosen the jacket and slide back.
Fold the rubber back and insert your new section of pipe, fold rubber back over new pipe.
Slide the metal jackets back over the rubber and tighten the screws to 60 inch pounds.

These repairs are very reliable and approved to be buried in walls.
 
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Old 11-04-16, 01:57 PM
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It's kind of a hack repair but often if it is just an intermittent leak you can slather some heavy-bodied PVC cement over the area (when not actively leaking) and seal it up. If you can't find the heavy cement then simply dissolve PVC shavings into some standard PVC cement.
 
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Old 11-06-16, 09:56 AM
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This is great for a temporary (permanent) fix on leaking drain lines.
Be sure to clean the outside of the repair area with some solvent based cleaner to remove any oil or grime from the surfaces before applying the GOOP.
Place a fillet in the corner of the coupling and pipe and press it in smoothly.
You can get it at Walmart, auto parts stores and most other hardware stores.

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Old 11-06-16, 01:58 PM
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I agree with ace, GOOP is a good product. I use it myself.
 
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Old 11-06-16, 02:24 PM
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No, NO, no

from what you have descrive the fernco type coupling is exactlty what you need. If you cant get the existing pipe pulled apart to install a conventional PVC fitting then this is the best option. They are very good options, just clean the pipe well before installation!
 
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Old 11-06-16, 03:13 PM
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Marq, it depends on WHERE and and exactly HOW / WHY it is leaking. If it is leaking at a joint where the pipe was fully inserted and had sufficient solvent cement for strength BUT simply did not fully seal the joint then the makeshift repairs using either a thick-bodied PVC cement OR the GOOP are adequate.

Granted, cutting it all apart and doing it up with new fittings and the "Fernco" is the ideal fix but it isn't always necessary to go that far.
 
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Old 11-06-16, 04:15 PM
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Just to add, while they do make PVC slip couplings, I can't imagine getting one to actually 'slip' into place. The cement tends to cure quickly with that much surface area. I would much rather go the no-hub coupling route.

And FYI, if you do use a rubber coupling, use a no-hub coupling (with the metal shield). The rubber ones aren't approved for interior use (other than under a sink).
 
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Old 11-06-16, 04:17 PM
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It's kind of a hack repair but often if it is just an intermittent leak you can slather some heavy-bodied PVC cement over the area (when not actively leaking) and seal it up.
I've accidently drilled through ABS drain pipe for example. I feel ok patching a small hole with cement and a arced shaped piece of pipe, if that area of pipe is not holding water.
Repairing a joint is different and you will have to judge if the joint might leak or not.
 
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