Are these boiler valves even necessary?


  #1  
Old 11-20-16, 12:40 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Are these boiler valves even necessary?

I have a leaky valve in a pipe that moves hot water to a baseboard heater (I think).
These pipes run along the ceiling of the basement. I've included two pictures to better illustrate. the first valve (closest to the boiler) is a straight-up gate valve, the second is a gate valve with a spigot. that has a boiler drain tag on it, but it can't be as it is situated above the boiler.
Between the first valve and the boiler there is not other shut-off valve.
I think I just need one valve and I would rather that be a ball valve.
I suppose the spigot/drain is there in case I want to bleed that specific portion of the heating system, but that entire heating system gets done from a single point, down closer to the boiler.
It almost feels like these were added as an afterthought, though they preceded my ownership.
So my question is can I cut out both of these valves and replace with a single ball valve?
And if so, does it need to have a spigot/drain?
Plumbing isn't my strong suit, so sorry if there's an obvious answer here that I missed.
Thanks

running from my Name:  IMG_1161.jpg
Views: 319
Size:  52.8 KBName:  IMG_1160.jpg
Views: 288
Size:  38.9 KB
 
  #2  
Old 11-20-16, 12:55 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 8 Votes on 7 Posts
Welcome to the forums! Ball valves make better sense than globe or gate valves. BUT, how will you drain the system during maintenance if you eliminate the very valve you need to to that with? Leave the spigot valve and replace the other with a ball valve.
 
  #3  
Old 11-20-16, 02:12 PM
C
Member
Join Date: May 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 3,138
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Even if you have another valve lower in the system to drain the boiler, there is often a drain on each zone or leg of the system to aid in power purging the air out of the system. I agree with Larry that you should keep both valves, replacing with new ball valves if necessary to correct the leak.
 
  #4  
Old 11-20-16, 06:28 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
thanks, but one more question

Thanks, fellas, for the advice.
My house has five heating zones. With the exception of this drain, there is only the drain down by the boiler. When I bled out the system last year, I only used that drain and I was able to clear the air from all five zones from down there.
I've found that the guy who owned this house before me mickey-moused a lot of things (electrical, plumbing, even some minor construction). I wouldn't have put it by him to use these two valves if he was juuuust a little short on copper and had these old valves laying around.
Nonetheless, I will take your advice and replace both valves. I suppose it can't hurt...
Thanks again.
 
  #5  
Old 11-20-16, 07:35 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 62,677
Received 1,614 Votes on 1,486 Posts
thanks, but one more question
What's the question ?

I looked at your picture.... it's pretty hard to tell why that drain valve is there but it must have made sense to the person that installed it.

On my system there would be valves and drains on every zone.
 
  #6  
Old 11-30-16, 11:49 PM
steve_gro's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,092
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
With the valve 1/2 way open, give the packing nut 1/8th of a turn with a crescent wrench. If it still leaks, try another 1/8th turn.
 
  #7  
Old 11-30-16, 11:54 PM
steve_gro's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,092
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
With the valve 1/2 way open, try snugging the packing nut with a crescent wrench 1/8th of a turn. It shouldn't be loose or tight. If it still leaks, try another 1/8th turn.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: