Piping in Garage for Slab

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Old 12-17-16, 08:49 PM
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Piping in Garage for Slab

There's probably no way to determine the answer to my question based on a diagram, but wanted to see what some of you think. In my garage is piping like the diagram below. I assume this is my supply line coming in to my garage. I removed my water heater to repair a leaking pipe and to possibly plumb for a water softener. I'm trying to avoid treating the outside spigots. What are the odds the 3/4 pipe going back down into the slab supply the 2 spigots only? Do appliances on a slab typically receive water from pipes within the slab, or through the walls? I'm guessing most likely it's going to be from below in the slab as that makes the most sense. We have a second floor. All of the plumbing for the second floor is at the same end of the house as the garage, so that 3/4 going up probably feeds that area. One of the 1/2 inch lines supplies water to the sink in the bath. The other probably supplies the toilet. One more question/observation, how many of you have seen broken/malfunctioning valves? When I shut the valve off, water still flows.
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Old 12-17-16, 08:55 PM
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Irrigation

I installed an irrigation system several years ago. I tied in to my supply line before it enters my house, so at least the irrigation system won't be treated if I can't avoid the spigots. I thought I might install a bypass before the softener too just in case. So I guess it's not so bad if I can't avoid the spigots.
 
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Old 12-17-16, 09:10 PM
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The 1/2 pipe going down into the slab is a little puzzling to me. I guess it could going to the laundry room, IDK.
 
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Old 12-17-16, 09:53 PM
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Here's a video too. Probably won't help much, but might give a better idea of what the plumbs looks like...

I know, it's nasty-looking. I had no clue there was a leak until I started looking at the plumbing considering installing a water softener. This entire are is totally blocked by the water heater. Wasn't much of a leak, just a slight drip. Drips over time can make a mess though. I made this video to show a friend when I was trying to figure out what came from where and what went where, etc. As I said about the diagram, this appears to be the supply 3/4 line coming up out of the slab on the left side, then branches up with a 3/4 run going immediately down adjacent to the supply coming in. As I noted in a previous post. When I shut the valve off, the water still flows to the bathroom sink. I assume the valve is broken, assuming the pipes run the way I think they do.

https://youtu.be/HMLGwCvf-OA
 
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Old 12-19-16, 11:17 AM
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Hard to say for sure, but I doubt the original plumbing had 'home-run' lines just for the outside spigots. They are probably tied into the bathroom/kitchen piping.

I would probably leave the existing outside faucets the way they are, and maybe add a new, untreated faucet outside the garage that you can use for any significant watering and such.
 
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Old 12-19-16, 12:14 PM
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What are the odds the 3/4 pipe going back down into the slab supply the 2 spigots only?
The 3/4" pipe going down probably feeds the laundry room and kitchen, that's a lot more demand for water.
The 1/2" going down is probably to supply the spigots, either one or both.

If you want to get bold you can cut the 1/2" pipe going down and see what shuts off. Cap off the supply end with a sharkbite cap temporarily.
It looks like there's plenty of room to repair the pipe if it's not the one you want.
 
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Old 12-19-16, 10:13 PM
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Thanks for the responses.

Zorfdt, I actually did install a spigot in the garage that will not be softened/treated. I might put a T in that line when it warms up, cap the other spigot and use that line. Think I'll do the same in the back. I ran my irrigation supply line to the back yard. I can easily tap it to make another spigot there too.

Handyone, I thought that too (cutting in to the 1/2 to test). It was too cold, LOL. Got below zero while I was working on this project.

I completed the plumbing to install a softener. Took me much too long. Now I remember why I don't like plumbing. Nothing I sweated is leaking though (and I did a lot of sweating). I'll post pictures tomorrow.
 
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