Water putty in contact with hot water pipe

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  #1  
Old 12-26-16, 11:59 AM
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Water putty in contact with hot water pipe

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I want to seal off the holes around the pipes in the picture above, because mice like to come up through them and run around in the kitchen. I was thinking water putty would be a good solid deterrent to the mice and not of much use to them as nesting material (unlike, say, foam).

Does anyone foresee any problems with this? The one pipe is already pretty warm to the touch, but I suppose it could expand more in the summer. If I should leave a gap (and that might be tricky in that small space), how big a gap? The exterminator tells me that mice can squeeze through some tiny holes smaller than you'd think a mouse could fit through.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 12-26-16, 01:28 PM
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Water putty is OK. Hot water pipes are ran through drywall and compound all the time.

You could stuff some steel wool in the holes. That would keep the mice out and help as a backer for the putty when filling.
 
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Old 12-26-16, 01:31 PM
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Definitely stuff the holes full with steel wood. Mice will chew through many materials but they don't touch steel wool.
 
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Old 12-26-16, 01:36 PM
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Thanks for the photo. Perhaps I had too much holiday cheer but I'm not clear on the dimensions and exactly how the pipes are laid out. Perhaps you can give the size of the pipe or length of the rectangular hole. Is this picture right side up, with the tile being the back wall?

Anyway, assuming the space is small (less than 1/2 inch), I would use steel wool (or preferably copper mesh) mixed with some epoxy. This includes the space between the cabinet and the tile.
 
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Old 12-26-16, 01:51 PM
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Thanks for the steel wool suggestions, everyone! I think I'll try that mixed with some water putty to keep it in place.

Just from eyeballing, the rectangular holes are about 2" x 1" each, and the pipes are about .75" in diameter.

Sorry about the picture; I tried three times but couldn't get my picture to upload with the right orientation (it looks fine on my computer). The pipes run straight up and down and the left of the picture is really the top. The faux wood surface the pipes enter is the countertop. The metal thing at the bottom of the picture is the toaster, sitting on the counter and enticing the mice with all its breadcrumbs.
 
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Old 12-26-16, 04:37 PM
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Who ever put the counter top in should must have been a newbie. Best the pipes should have been cut then reconnected. Second best hole should have been drilled into the top to fit the pipes the a slot made. and the slot piece reinstalled after the counter was in place. Escutcheons should have been used also. Looking again the pipes should definitely been cut then spliced so the back splash didn't have to be cut.

If you did this sorry for the comment but I'd at least suggest replacing the piece of back splash cut out. If you paid some one to do this get them out to replace the top and do it right on their dime.

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Old 12-26-16, 05:12 PM
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No worries, I'm just the renter in this unit (to be fair, it dates to the 1880s), and the exterminator and landlord have already pointed out many ways in which work was done in less than competent manner by previous owners and that that's not helping with the mouse entry points. We're probably moving out soonish, and I just want to keep mouse deterrent efforts to a minimum.
 
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Old 12-26-16, 07:38 PM
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Apparently we're looking at the top of a counter in an apartment. To stop mice you have to prevent them from getting into the apartment not just the top of of the countertop. But by the time they get to the hole you're showing they're already in.

You have to figure out how they're getting under the counter and stop that. My guess is to look at where the pipes come from and block that up but fill in any holes you find.
 
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Old 12-27-16, 07:11 AM
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Would that it were so simple! We've been having contractors inspect the building and seal off potential entry points for two years. At this point, a quick fix to make it not so easy for the mice to get into the kitchen, if possible, would dramatically improve our quality of life.
 
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Old 12-27-16, 10:08 AM
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Consider this, each female can produce 8 litters per year with an average of 6 pups per litter or roughly 50 young per female. Given the extent of your problem, I'd go with snap traps lined up against the wall in groups of three.

I'm sorry but I don't think closing a space inside the apartment will be more than a minor inconvenience for your guests.
 
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