Temporary installation of sharkbite end stop.


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Old 03-21-17, 12:49 PM
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Temporary installation of sharkbite end stop.

I cut a 1/2" hot line that was suspected of leaking in the footing and/or under the slab. The purpose was to confirm which of three hot lines is leaking and cut water to that line until the plumbers can do there thing. When the plumbers reroute all hot copper lines so they don't pass under or into the slab the sharkbite will be removed and replaced with sweated caps.

It basically worked well, but this morning, with the hot water shutoff after being on for an hour, the sharbite had a slow drip. I didn't turn the hot back on, but wonder how fast that leak would be under pressure. I decided to remove it, see if the pipe is cut square and deburred. (This was done during the night in a confined space and not enough rook to cut with a pipe cutter.)

I can't get the sharbite off and I have the orange plastic removal tool. I wonder if it is because I pushed the sharkbite on too far. (more than an inch?) No, I didn't place a 1" mark up the pipe so that I didn't go too far.

Anyway, the sound of running water, which had been getting louder over the weekend, was substantially diminished. I think that indicates that the isolated line was leaking. However, does the fact that the sound is still there indicate that one or both of the other two pipes is also leaking under the slab?

Meanwhile, I have the second pipe cut and am ready to slip on a sharkbite end stop, and this time I will measure and mark the 1" point, but will put all on hold until I here from someone.

As for pipe 1, any suggestions as to how to remove the sharbite. I am being very careful not to put pressure on the sweat fitting locate about a foot away. It may be that I am simply need to use some force. Per a youtube video playing in the backgound, it takes a lot of force to remove one with the little orange tool.

Thanks.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 01:05 PM
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it takes a lot of force to remove one with the little orange tool.
That is correct. You need to push the tool in as far as it will go, hold it in place and turn the valve slightly while pulling it off.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 01:19 PM
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Thanks Pete. I just tried getting some force withe channel locks and it didn't work, but I wasn't turning the valve. I may just cut the pipe an inch above the stop so as not to worry about breaking the sweated joints. Pictures of the manifold I have opened up is attached, along with line 2 which should be ready for its own sharkbite end stop, but I am wondering if the cut is too out of square for even a temporary closure. I had to cut it with an oscillating multitool.

I left off the pictures, which are now attached. As I look at the close up of the one ready to cap with an end stop, it doesn't look very square but for temporary use in an open wall?
 
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Old 03-21-17, 01:21 PM
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If you have an available piece of 1/2" tubing, take your available sharkbite cap and put it on it. Then practice taking it off when your in a comfortable setting. It'll give you an idea of the force and execution to remove it. Apply that experience to your confined space tubing.


Edit: These have assisted me in the past, not sure if you have room for even these though...

http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-10...2985/100021967

Edit #2. Sharkbites seal with an rubber o-ring. Oscillating tools sometimes leave very sharp burrs on copper pipes. Maybe you nicked/cut the o-ring on your first one causing the leak.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 01:30 PM
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Keep in mind, too, the printed side of the tool should go away from the sharkbite fitting for an easier removal.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 01:33 PM
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I have one, Tumble, and there isn't enough room before the tube was cut. Now that it is cut in two places, I may be gently able to pull it away from the nearby 3/4" and use it, but I doubt it based on experience with the now capped and leaking 1/2" that I am trying to get the end stop off.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 01:36 PM
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That I thought of, Chandler, and checked the picture on the package.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 03:10 PM
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kl-

I do it like this guy does with 2 fingers. You have to have even pressure on the tool as you push the tool back on the pipe towards the fitting. If you have it a little cocked as you push I donít think it would work.

The tool should fit snuggly around the copper pipe with no gaps if you are using the right size tool. I donít think you actually feel a release or anything when you do it (I just did a ĺ a minute ago to remind me how it feels) so you shouldnít expect to feel a pop or something like that when the Sharkbite releases.

You have to try and get the Sharkbite off the pipe while you have that little tan piece pushed into the Sharkbite fitting and are holding it in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FDBaXBUPNg
 
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Old 03-21-17, 03:21 PM
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Yeah... there are tons of videos showing the removal but you need room and a little practice.

It was mentioned that your pipe wasn't clean. That's real important. You need a roll of emery cloth to clean that burr off. The sharkbites need to slide on to smooth pipe. A burr could also keep the fitting from releasing too.

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Old 03-21-17, 04:58 PM
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The cap should be rotatable if it is on right. Maybe you could push the cap on even more to make sure itís on correctly before you try to remove it. Could it be a little cocked somehow?

You should be able to grip the pipe in one hand very firmly so it doesnít move while you are pulling , maybe using a grip pad, and with your other hand use the tool and pull really hard with the tool.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 05:43 PM
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You don't need to rotate the cap to pull it off, although any push on fitting should rotate easily. You also shouldn't worry too much about pulling a solder joint apart.
I looked briefly at the video and it is correct.
I have removed fittings with only a 6" crescent wrench set to the proper diameter/width.
You are possibly trying too hard. Just push in the flange and pull it off.

I use a 12V craftsman multi-tool all the time if needed in close quarters. I recommend the original Fein blades, they fit almost every tool. A new Fein blade will slice through the copper easily.
I use Fein blade #63502152270 for everything.
It's important to keep the pipe from vibrating so you can make a clean/square cut and then debur as said.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 09:16 PM
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Good input from you guys. Keeping the pipe from vibrating when using a multi-tool is much more difficult to do when making the second cut. The first time I tried cutting one it was especially difficult (and dangerous) since the lines had yet to dry out and while not under full pressure, there was some spray as a result of water still left in the lines.

I hear Brian on the Fein blade. As is my Dremel blade is probably dull and it had to work too hard to cut copper.

I didn't have emery cloth but cleaned the pipe pretty well with 300 grit sandpaper and deburred the edge with a tine fine file. Still, it may well be that emery cloth would have done the trick.

As for what zoesdad said, I checked both end stops and neither will rotate. It wasn't clear to me how far they needed to be pushed on, but I marked the 1" point and both are about 1/4 inch short of the mark. Quite possibly they need more of a push.

I just noticed that the leak from the sharkbite attched to the first 1/2" pipe is barely leaking and, while it sprayed a fine mist from the elbow joint above when hot water was initially turned back on, the joint no longer leaks. My guess that the pipe expanded as it heated and sealed the sweated joint, while nearly sealing the sharkbite.

Here is something I should have thought. Is it okay to remove a sharkbite and reinstall it?

Neither end stop is cocked, but I noted when trying to remove one with the tool that all to often one side would push in but not the other.

I don't know if this makes a difference, but on the first that was removed, I tried but gave up on removing the plastic piece that I believe isn't needed for copper. In doing so, it may have been damaged on the shark's teeth. After cutting the pipe more squarely, and removing the section that the shark bit into, it still leaks even though it is pushed on a bit further than the one pushed onto the other 1/2. Before using that one I was able to easily extract the plastic liner.

Meanwhile, I had to take order a hot water heater so I picked up a junior pipe cutter at the HD. but I don't think there is even enough room for it to work.

I am getting an idea why a good plumber is well paid.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 11:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Handyone
I have removed fittings with only a 6" crescent wrench set to the proper diameter/width.
What he said....

Originally Posted by Handyone
It's important to keep the pipe from vibrating so you can make a clean/square cut and then debur as said.
I have used 1X 2s,3s and 4s to wedge in between the various copper pipes, this provides tension which hold the pipes pretty stable for anything you want to do, cut, debur, etc.


Originally Posted by klawman213
Is it okay to remove a sharkbite and reinstall it?
Yes, that's why I suggested practicing on a free pipe to get the feel of it.

The teeth on the sharkbite are very sharp and bite into the copper, if you buggered them up in anyway, they might be preventing the cap from rotating.

It sounds like you've nicked the o-ring on he first one, it'll never be reliable if so.
 
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Old 03-22-17, 08:28 AM
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Thanks Tumble. Not sure what I did to the first sharbite or just what you call the o-ring, but whatever I would never rely on it. Especially in an enclosed wall. I don't even trust it in the open wall while trying to find a plumber.

For those of us new to sharbite's that may look at this, I found a nice video with a cutaway sharbite explaining how it works and how it can be removed in several ways. Click here for it. One thing it shows is how it is important to pull back evenly on both sides to release the teeth.

Apparently what I removed is called a "sleeve" and from what I found on my bench, I removed it from the both, but had trouble getting it out of the first, the one that has a slow drip, as it seemed to have caught on a tooth.

A guy I want to hire is supposed to give me an estimate this morning and if it is reasonable I won't be fiddling with things as he will be on it this weekend.

Thanks to you and all for the help.
 
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Old 03-22-17, 11:44 AM
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but whatever I would never rely on it. Especially in an enclosed wall. I don't even trust it in the open wall while trying to find a plumber.
I do trust them. I've seen all kinds of leaks, but not from a push on fitting like Sharkbite or John Guest (JG is outside wall only).
I replace a lot of old angle stops, you would be surprised how little compression is needed to seal the ferrule and keep the valve from blowing off.

That said I wouldn't use one in your situation. A push on fitting isn't needed for your permanent repair.
 
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Old 03-22-17, 05:28 PM
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Well, the sharkbites are doing alright for a week or so, but I am only running hot water a couple an hours a day when I can keep an eye on them. Meanwhile, when I turn the hot on at the heater valve there is no hot water to a couple of sinks which is no big deal as the plumber is supposed to reroute all the hot lines this Saturday. If he burns us, and so far it is all manana as far as giving us an estimate, we may have a problem and now I have to consider replacing the water pressure reducing valve, but that is for another thread.
 
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Old 03-26-17, 05:08 PM
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To follow up on the tgrouble with sharkbites, the tubing was out of round. When a sharp cutter was used with room to get a straight cut, the sharbite was easy on and off with either the little orange sharkbite tool or a 12" crescent wrench.
 
 

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