Does this gas range valve need replacing?


  #1  
Old 04-10-17, 08:25 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Does this gas range valve need replacing?

We are getting a new gas range and we didn't know if the current gas valve should be replaced or not since it is an old valve. It looks like it is outdated and needs to be replaced. Should we get this replaced?

Name:  IMG_6343.jpg
Views: 660
Size:  37.7 KB

Name:  IMG_6344.jpg
Views: 386
Size:  36.9 KB
 
Attached Images  
  #2  
Old 04-10-17, 08:47 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, I would recommend you change the valve to something like this: (not in stock but available)

Eastman 1/2 in. x 1/2 in. Angle Flare Brass IPS Gas Ball Valve-60034 - The Home Depot

It's safer and should allow you to install the range close to the rear wall. You might also need a shorter pipe coming up through the floor.
Most modern ranges only give you about 6" or so from the floor to fit the valve and flex line in the cavity behind the range.
 
  #3  
Old 04-10-17, 09:14 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,837
Received 1,475 Votes on 1,363 Posts
Definitely get it replaced.
If you don't change it yourself.... you'll need to get a plumber.
The appliance delivery company cannot change a valve.
If you replace that valve you will be required to turn the gas off at the meter.
 
  #4  
Old 04-11-17, 10:38 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 26
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Its going to be tight trying to get that off and the new one on. Is there enough room between the drywall and that pipe to spin the valve
 
  #5  
Old 04-11-17, 06:23 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The basement has a finished ceiling. To shorten the pipe, would that mean opening up the ceiling to make this happen?

The pipe is far enough away from the wall to replace the valve. If I were to replace the valve, not shorten the pipe, would the steps be: shut off the gas at the meter, unscrew old valve and replace with new valve, and then check for leaks?

Thanks for the input on this!
 
  #6  
Old 04-11-17, 07:00 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I don't recommend you work on your own gas fittings. If you do, you are correct. Shut off gas at meter and remove valve. Use two wrenches (pipe wrench and a crescent wrench) and ensure the pipe going down does not turn or be disturbed in any way.
Once the valve is removed clean the male pipe threads with a wire brush or wire wheel on a drill.

Apply pipe dope to the male pipe threads only, not the internal threads of the valve and tighten it.
Do not use dope on any of the flare/flex line connections, just use 2 crescent wrenches to tighten the flex line firmly, one holding the valve and the other turning the flare nut.

You MUST be familiar with lighting pilots to do this. If there's any doubt call the gas company and they will usually light them for you at no charge.
Turn off the main gas line and any lines/valves going to dryers or furnaces and water heater.
Usually the only pilot you need to relight is the water heater, but make sure you know what you are doing.
Make sure the furnace has electronic ignition and make sure it functions properly after doing the repairs. Turn it up to a high setting and check flame is lit.

RectorSeal 1.75 oz. #5 Pipe Thread Sealant-25790 - The Home Depot
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: