Natural gas meter exchange

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Old 08-14-17, 09:51 AM
J
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Natural gas meter exchange

Hello all,

Was browsing this forum again, and also had a quick question to ask, more curious than anything.

Recently had a Gas Technician come in to exchange my Natural Gas meter for a new one.

Two things he did I wasnt sure why:

After installing the new meter and turning the outside main shutoff back on he appeared to douse the main shuttoff with gasoline(if thats what it was) from a gas can, is this a way to check for leaks??

and two: After relighting pilot for Water Heater he lit the area under the exhaust vent with a lighter, not sure what this does (burns off any gas that may have been vented during lighting)??

alos is there anything else I should check? We did not relite the furnace pilot as it appears to not have one (or at least an electric one which lights on demand)

Thanks
 
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Old 08-14-17, 09:55 AM
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If that was gasoline you should have been able to smell it..... right ?
If I had to guess I'd say it was soapy water.

He put a flame near the base of the exhaust vent to see if there was a draft.
The flame would have been drawn into the flue signifying a vacuum/draft.
 
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Old 08-14-17, 09:59 AM
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Thanks

Well I didnt smell anything immediately so not sure. So he checked that there was a draight as there is supposed to be one if things are ok, correct?

Thanks again
 
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Old 08-14-17, 10:21 AM
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Had there not been a draft.... the exhaust gases would be coming into the room.
In that case the flame would have been pushed away from the vent hood.
 
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Old 08-14-17, 01:00 PM
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the exhaust gases would be coming into the room
He was checking for an upwards draft as Pete said.
I just wanted to point out Carbon Monoxide gas is deadly and it has no odor.

This advice has nothing to do with the repairs that were made, but I would recommend a carbon monoxide detector in all homes.
 
 

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