Need to replace toilet water shut off valve on CPVC pipe


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Old 10-22-17, 11:54 AM
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Need to replace toilet water shut off valve on CPVC pipe


I need to replace the above shut off valve for my toilet to possibly fix violet rattling when I turn on the water. After doing some research, it seems it can be more involved than replacing the valve on a copper pipe. Since, I have CPVC pipe, the valve could not have been soldered on. Right? Do I need to cut the valve off, and then use CPVC primer to clean the pipe, and then apply the CPVC cement and then push in the new valve? Or would I be able to use the same steps as on a copper pipe? If you look on the picture, it currently has some sort of green compound on the joints which appear to be plumbing compounds applied by the builder. It currently is one of those Brass Craft multi turn valve that look like 1/2 in. Nominal Compression Inlet x 3/8 in. O.D. Compression Outlet Multi-Turn Angle Valve-OCR19X C1 - The Home Depot

I'll wait for your advice. Thank you
 
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Old 10-22-17, 12:37 PM
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That is a compression type valve where you tighten the nut and it squeezes a ferrule tighter on the pipe.

Probably easier to just switch over to a sharkbite service shutoff valve.
Remove yours and this one just pushes on.
SharkBite 1/2 in. Chrome-Plated Brass Push-to-Connect Quarter-Turn Angle Stop
 
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Old 10-22-17, 12:59 PM
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I would recommend a sharkbite also. Here's a few tips on installation:
- mark the pipe at ~7/8" depth before pushing on the valve. That will ensure no second guessing on how far it was pushed on.
- Push the valve on firmly with a slight twist. If the pipe in the wall moves back, hold it gently with pliers while pushing.

Edit: Changing the valve will probably stop all shaking. Shaking is due to restricted flow through the valve in most cases.
 
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Old 10-22-17, 01:12 PM
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It sounds like with sharkbite, I do not have to use any plumbing joint compound. Correct? Does my current compression valve look like it needs to be hacked sawed off from CPVC? I'm hoping everything will come off when I loosen the nut and ferrule.....
 

Last edited by BeingCareful88; 10-22-17 at 01:36 PM. Reason: more question
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Old 10-22-17, 01:29 PM
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No, cut off the old valve. Carefully remove any cutting burs both inside and out and then mark the pipe. It looks like you have plenty of pipe coming out of the wall. No compound or anything, just push the valve on to full depth, ~ 3/4"
 
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Old 10-22-17, 01:40 PM
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Hmmm, I was hoping I can avoid the cutting. I'll have to buy a hacksaw. I will have about 1 and 1/2 of CPVC pipe after cutting the old valve. Will 1 and 1/2 inch of pipe be long enough for sharebit to fit?
 
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Old 10-22-17, 01:58 PM
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The reason for cutting is the pipe needs to be round, you can't do that by removing the old ferrule.

Let me joke please, it's either $6 for a hacksaw or $200 or more for a plumber.
 
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Old 10-22-17, 02:01 PM
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1-1/2" is plenty of pipe for a Sharkbite. If you cut with a hacksaw, deburr both inside and outside diameters before pushing on. When you buy the Sharbite, also pickup the plastic removal tool. It is handy to have and should be under a buck.
 
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Old 10-22-17, 02:15 PM
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It looks like it will be easier and cleaner to cut CPVC with a PVC cutter like this (RIDGID PC1375 PVC and Tube Cutter-23493 - The Home Depot) instead of using hack saw. Any specific brand of PVC cutter you can recommend for cutting 1/2inch CPVC please?
 

Last edited by BeingCareful88; 10-22-17 at 02:42 PM. Reason: pvc cutter
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Old 10-22-17, 03:11 PM
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I would suggest staying with a hacksaw. It's easy to cut and clean the pipe.
 
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Old 10-22-17, 03:57 PM
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I would remove the valve first and take a look at it. If you see deposits put some limeaway in it . It should bubble up if there is any thing in there. If you decide to change the valve, remove the old valve but leave the nuts and ferrules on the pipe. Remove the new nuts and ferrules from the new valve and replace.
 
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Old 10-22-17, 04:08 PM
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All you really need is the hacksaw blade. I would suggest a 32 teeth-per-inch blade and then wrap some tape around it on one end to use as a handle.
 
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Old 10-23-17, 06:16 AM
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You will never regret owning a hacksaw. It will be amazing to you how many of life's problems you will be able to cut out with a simple hacksaw.
 
 

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