Do pipes need replacing?


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Old 11-08-17, 04:15 PM
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Do pipes need replacing?

I recently did a temporary fix a pinhole leak in my copper pipe using rubber magic tape and was thinking of doing a permanent fix by soldering the pinholes later. However, I was told I should be replacing my pipes with ABS pipe. I've attached a picture of my pipes. Can someone confirm if it is necessary to replace the whole pipe (from top to bottom in the pic)

Thanks
 
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Old 11-08-17, 05:22 PM
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How much work are you willing to go through? If the pin hole in the copper appears to be caused by age, wear, or corrosion and it might be typical of the whole run, then yes, you should replace with PEX piping. However, sometimes, it may be just an anomaly in that one spot and a quick solder job letting capillary action fill the whole may solve the problem. I had a valve with a pin hole in it. Discovered after I soldered the whole system. Used solder to fill the hole and it's been good for over 30 years since.

Not familiar with rubber magic tape, but I have used Rescue Tape and recommend it to those who need a long term but temp fix.
 
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Old 11-08-17, 05:49 PM
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Try squeezing the pipe where the pinhole is. It may be worse then can be seen from the outside. The pinhole could just be a starting leak. The pipe may be in poor shape.
 
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Old 11-08-17, 06:26 PM
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I would go ahead and replace as much pipe as possible while you have the wall open.
You will need 2 special no-hub couplers that connect copper to ABS. The copper and ABS have different outside diameters.
If the copper is 1-1/2" you will need no-hub number 3001-150
 
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Old 11-09-17, 07:00 AM
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I'd be replacing every inch of that pipe with ABS or PVC which ever is common in your area.
Any time I've came across that old larger pipe any place it ran horizontal the whole bottom of the pipe was paper thin and leaked.
 
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Old 11-09-17, 08:01 AM
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Thanks for all your replies/advice everyone! I will start looking into replacing the pipe and probably cutting out the drywall to replace the pipe horizontally within the walls.
Which type of pipe is good for this job: ABS or PVC? Also, what's the difference between no-hub coupling and flex coupling?

Thanks!
 
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Old 11-09-17, 09:00 AM
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Was this a pin hole leak in the pipe or a fitting joint.

Copper is forever, at least something close, I would never replace good copper pipe with PVC or ABS.

In a lot of locations you are not allowed to put PVC/ABS in a wall.

This is not a normal situation!
 
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Old 11-09-17, 11:34 AM
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No-hubs are designed specifically for this purpose, to replace sections of pipe with complete confidence.
They are allowed to be buried in walls, have a middle stop and ribs, and will not leak when installed properly.
So called flex couplings will not fit most pipes snuggly and are not approved for in-wall use as far as I know.

Post back when you need specific advice on how to install the couplers.
 
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Old 11-13-17, 10:03 AM
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Brian is correct. No-hub couplings (with the shielding on the outside) are the only flexible couplers allowed for plumbing use above-ground.

You can often get away with the rubber-only couplings for sink connections and things outside of the wall, but they aren't permitted for drain/vent use typically.

Pinhole leaks in copper seems to be correlated to the composition of your water. A combination of pH and certain minerals. There's quite a bit of controversy as to what specifically causes it - but I've seen it myself in my own house, so I know it's true.
 
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Old 11-17-17, 08:06 AM
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I have figured out that since the pipes are so close to the wall, I'll have to use a sawzall to cut it. The pipe width is 1.5 inches, so I couldn't find one of those cutting wheel tools for that size, so sawzall seems like the best thing.

Can someone help me with these two questions:
- What type of blade should I use to cut copper pipe?
- How do I support the pipes so that it won't shake during the cut?

I was told that excessive vibration during the cutting process can cause problems, especially for the vertical pipe going into the ground.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 11-17-17, 08:13 AM
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I can't help with your problem as I am not a plumber. But...I once lived in a house with acid water and the acid ate holes in either the pipe or ate the joints up. (I recall seeing pin holes in the body of the pipe). Have you ever checked the acidity in your water?
 
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Old 11-17-17, 09:57 AM
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The copper is pretty easy to cut, I would use an oscillating tool (or called a multi-tool).
Buy the wide metal cutting blades, I would recommend Bosch or Fein blades, they fit almost any brand of tool. I use a 12V craftsman tool.

The pipe will still vibrate so try to shim it or maybe wrap towels around it. The tool doesn't cut as easy with the pipe vibrating. Also hold on tight to the tool and let it do the work. You might want to practice on a piece of 1/2" copper.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Bosch-1-...134C/205373459
 
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Old 11-19-17, 07:33 AM
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Thanks for the tip, Walleye Hunter and Handyone! I'll look into checking the pH of my water and trying out an oscillating tool to cut the pipe.
 
 

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