Galvanized 3/4 tee replacement?


  #1  
Old 12-02-17, 07:15 PM
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Galvanized 3/4 tee replacement?

I have a 3/4 galvanized steel pipe supplying my house ( magnet sticks to it, scratches silver grey).
it tees off to a 1/2" copper, which I want to replace with 3/4" pex.
I figured I could probably undo the copper and replace it with a 3/4" threaded but I can't be sure of the state of the on the inside.
If I have to cut off the entire tee, how can I fit in a new pex tee instead since the pipe is rigid, it will be
impossible to retrofit a new tee...
click to enlarge
 
  #2  
Old 12-02-17, 09:20 PM
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Why are you trying to upsize the copper? If that is 1/2" copper (which should not be connected directly to steel) then that tee is a 1/2" tee. If you're hoping to get more volume somewhere by replacing the 1/2" copper with 3/4" pex, I suspect you should shift your focus to replacing the galvanized first. It's old and likely to be rusted inside. If it's supplying an entire house, it's under-sized.
 
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Old 12-03-17, 01:30 AM
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The 1/2" supplies a water tank that I want to upsize to 3/4.
it looks like a 3/4, 3/4, 3/4 tee with a reducer fitted into it to make it 1/2".

If I replace the whole section of galvanized then there will be quite a few sharbites at the 1/2" junctions, which could get expensive?
 
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Old 12-03-17, 06:05 AM
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I would cut the copper a few inches below the tee and unscrew the copper adapter from the tee, making sure to hold back on the tee with another wrench. Once it's removed you can loo and feel inside the tee with your pinkie to try to determine the condition of the existing galv. tee. If it's "good enough", screw a brass PEX male adapter into the tee and go from there.

If you decide you want to replace the tee, it's going to be quite a bit more difficult and I would consider calling in a professional, at that point.

If you don't want to mess with it at all, just cut the copper and throw a 1/2' x 3/4" Sharkbite coupling on the copper and then goto PEX. It's not ideal, as you'll still have a tiny section of 1/2", but it's copper so it should be open and it'll get you by if you aren't trying to spend a lot of mone right now.
 
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Old 12-03-17, 06:25 AM
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To replace that tee you must go left or right of the tee and find an elbow. You could go both ways and replace as much galv as you can..

Once you get to an elbow, just cut the pipe on one side of ell. Then simply unscrew elbow and install female pex adapter or female solder adapter. Depending on what you want to replace pipe with..

Then unscrew pipe to tee, unscrew tee, then other length of pipe to next fitting... Simple screw in/on adapters where needed...

Simple really...
 
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Old 12-03-17, 09:16 AM
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If I cut the t out is there a compression fitting I could use on the galvanized pipe or is threaded only recommended?
 
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Old 12-03-17, 09:21 AM
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IMO threaded only... Brass.... Then to copper...

If doing pex adapters they are all brass...
 
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Old 12-03-17, 09:26 AM
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Old 12-03-17, 03:27 PM
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I agree with Mike, there isn't a good (or really any) way to connect to a non-threaded portion of steel pipe.

If you're going to be doing more than one PEX connection, go ahead and invest in a PEX crimper. They aren't that expensive and in the long-run are just as easy to use as sharkbite connections.

As Steve mentioned, any steel pipe that's in use is probably nearing the end of its lifespan. As long as you're doing plumbing work around, I'd try to replace as much as possible.
 
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Old 12-03-17, 10:02 PM
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I've blown up that image and don't see anything that looks like a reducer or bushing. 1/2" galvanized pipe is just shy of 7/8" OD. It wouldn't accomplish much to feed a water tank with 3/4" from a 1/2" line (assuming the copper is 1/2"). And if the galvanized is 1/2" and feeding your whole house, that's where you should start repiping.

Are you on city water or a well?
 
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Old 12-04-17, 07:41 AM
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I thought it was my very old eyes because I also couldn’t find the reducer. I was thinking maybe it is a reducing tee but it seems like from the picture that’s not the case either.
 
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Old 12-05-17, 05:57 AM
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qwerty-

I saved these tables from this reference years ago. IMHO this is a really good reference to have on hand. As steve said a 1/2 inch galvanized pipe is just shy of 7/8 O.D. (i.e. 0.840<0.875).

(Galvanized is covered by the “Wrought Iron” Table).

Notes on Pipe
 
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Old 12-05-17, 06:46 PM
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Yeah it looked just like 3/4 but on holding up a threaded coupler, there's no way it would fit.
So, I can definitely replace the whole lot with 3/4 pex but the city inlet before the main house stop valve looks to be galvanized also.
The floor stop valve could probably have a pex threaded coupler added to it though. If that too has galvanized then my only option is the cut it and re-thread the pipe to add a pex union?
 
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Old 12-06-17, 10:52 PM
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You should try to determine where the city responsibility ends and yours begins. If you're in Quebec, did you ever get water meters? That's typically where ownership changes hands. It would also be good to know your incoming water pressure. You can get a cheap gauge that screws onto a hose bib at HD.

1/2" galvanized is too small to feed an entire house, and it's likely to be clogged with rust by this time, It won't flow enough water unless the pressure is way over the top. But it's probably not the best time of year to start digging up your front lawn. You would have to dig to below the frost line.

Perhaps you should go from the threaded valve with a PEX adapter, then think about the rest over the winter.
 
 

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