How to open this trap?

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Old 12-08-17, 12:16 AM
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How to open this trap?

I know how to unscrew the takeout, but I couldn't figure out a way to open this trap. And also, why is the bottom of the cabinet to close to the bottom of the trap, its almost like u can't put a cup under the takeout after u unscrew it.
Just for your information, the 3 drain lines going into the traps are kitchen sink, and washer and dryer from the other side of the wall.
 
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Old 12-08-17, 12:20 AM
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That is about the most screwed-up assembly I have ever seen. If it were mine I would cut it all out and start from scratch.

First thing to determine is does that pipe going through the floor also connect with the pipe (vent) in the wall.
 
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Old 12-08-17, 05:54 AM
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I agree. That is quite a cluster. What is feeding the drain pipe on the other side of the wall?

You can't remove or really open the trap without cutting it out. You can remove the drain plug on the bottom to remove the liquid inside and might have some luck fishing around through the hole with a piece of wire with a hook bent into the end. If you want to remove just the trap I would cut on the green lines, clean out the trap and use rubber boot/Fernco/shielded couplings to put things back together.



Boy, you have some of the most interesting things in your house.
 
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Old 12-08-17, 09:14 AM
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Is there an access plug on the bottom of the trap?
 
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Old 12-08-17, 09:51 AM
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Man!!! Whatever drains from the back wall into that double Y is certainly not trapped... Im sure you are getting sewer gas up through the sink...

What is it that comes from the back wall?

I would cut it all out and reconfigure with an AAV ( vent).. But we need to know whats draining from that back fixture...

But I would assume there is another trap on the other side of the wall....
 
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Old 12-08-17, 11:15 AM
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Just a thought, any chance that back wall cnnection is a vent?
 
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Old 12-08-17, 11:42 AM
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I can't tell for certain but I suspect that connection in the wall is a sanitary tee BUT when the sink was installed (probably a deeper sink than original) the branch was too high to fit a normal trap. The ingenious sink installer (previous owner or maybe even the original poster here) then put in the conglomeration shown with the drain through the floor connecting up to the drainage piping somewhere in the basement or crawlspace.

IF my supposition is correct then the new drain work going through the floor should all be eliminated and the wall opened to allow the sanitary tee to be lowered to a point where normal trap fittings would work.

Just my opinion.
 
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Old 12-08-17, 12:59 PM
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This is like a suspense thriller. It's a slow day at work and I'm just dying for BurgerKing to get home from work and back to his project so we can find out "who done it".
 
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Old 12-08-17, 02:24 PM
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For ďaccess plugĒ, do u mean ďtakeoutĒ, well there is a take out, but itís just that when u open the takeout there isnít room to put a cup under to collect the water. Drain line from the back is from a washing machine from the other side of the wall and I believe there isnít a trap. I didnít build this, Iím smart enough not to build such a messy set up. Well the trap here is trapping both the kitchen drain and the washing machine drain from the other side of the wall.
 
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Old 12-13-17, 03:25 PM
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The white is prolly the dishwasher drain I just realize. Sry
 
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Old 12-13-17, 03:38 PM
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If all you want to do is put a cup under the clean out plug, take the screws out of the bottom of the cabinet and take out the front 2 pieces of cabinet floor.
 
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Old 12-14-17, 07:28 AM
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If you can't get a cup under the clean out try a cookie sheet.
 
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Old 12-14-17, 04:10 PM
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I prolly will redo the drain system. It costs money and time but I get piss off just looking at it.
 
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Old 12-14-17, 06:16 PM
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That has led me to properly fix more than a few things. Ripping out and re-doing may cost a little money and be a hassle but it's nice in the long run when it's no longer something to worry about.
 
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Old 12-15-17, 02:50 AM
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Code violation!! Gut it!

I don't know if you're under IPC or UPC, but I do know that is a mess and needs to be gutted. P-trap should be higher than that. I'd say at least 6" above the bottom so you can access it (not sure if that is a code rule or just common sense). If the drop to the top of the P-trap is more than 24" then it is a code violation under the IRC (International Residential Code) "the maximum vertical distance between the sink drain and the entrance to the p-trap is 24 inches". That applies regardless of whether you're under IPC, UPC, or another plumbing code. Under UPC the entire developed length of all tailpieces and trap arm must be 24" or less.

First off, if the line going back into the wall is going to a vent, then it is a code violation because it does not have a trap before the vent. Additionally, a wye is not the correct fitting for a vent as it blocks airflow-- it would need to be a sanitary tee. If it is not a vent and is just for waste to come down from another fixture, then you have an S-trap that will siphon the water from the P-trap and allow sewer gases up. Both situations lead to unwanted sewer gas coming up from your sink and it can make people very sick-- I know from experience.

My best guess is that it is the latter of the two and that the pipe in the wall is bringing wastewater down. There is a special fitting you could use to connect the dishwasher-- search terms would be something like "1-1/2 in. Dishwasher branch Tailpiece".

If there is no nearby vent that it can attach to, you can use an AAV. You'd put the tailpiece on, then have the P-trap, run the trap arm out at least 4-inches (so you don't create a crown vent-- which would allow water to be siphoned), then have a sanitary tee where the top pipe goes up about 6" (might be 4", but I'd recommend 6" if you can get it), bottom goes down to main plumbing and connects to main line with a wye and 1/8 bend or a combo wye. You will probably have to tear out the entire back wall of that cabinet to gain access to stuff. I would re-route the drainage from whatever fixture seems to be draining in to the sink's drain so that it goes somewhere else or ties in after the P-trap and AAV. The AAV must be an an open space and be accessible. It can not be enclosed in the wall unless there is free airflow and an access panel.

Now, if there *is* a vent in the wall that you can access, forego the AAV and run it much the way I described but connect the trap arm to the vent within 5ft under IPC (the drop of the pipe cannot be greater than one pipe diameter because it would block airflow that is needed to help move the water-- the slope of the trap arm must be 1/4" per foot downward).

I hope I'm making sense.

Disclaimer: I'm not a plumber but I hang out on plumbing forums and have been studying plumbing code.
 

Last edited by ZanneJ; 12-15-17 at 02:54 AM. Reason: formatting issue with excessive line breaks
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Old 12-15-17, 09:46 AM
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Hi Zann...

Whew what a reply...

The trouble he has is its a washing machine draining in from the back. Not sure if you read the whole thread or not... That alone needs to be 2". And because that whole set up looks 1 1/2" its troublesome to come to a fix...

The sink can be easily fixed and an aav added, but the washer a what to do moment..

I been looking at this on and off for weeks.. Its baffling really!!! LOLOL
 
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Old 12-15-17, 08:03 PM
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Hi, Mike!

Yeah, washing machine draining down into that line like that is not good.

Does the washing machine have a vent of it's own? By code it should have a standpipe that has the P-trap between 6" to 18" above the floor and have it's own vent. Due to the high volume of water from a washing machine, I don't believe a wet vent is allowed (although I would have to look up the code).

Is the pipe diameter for the washing machine 2"? By code it needs to be at least 2". Kitchen sink drains are usually 1.25" to 1.5". It looks like 2" to me, but that's just eyeballing from the internet. Edit: Just noticed that Mike thinks it is 1.5"-- if so, it's all wrong. But it also should not connect before the trap like that.

If the washing machine is on the same floor as the kitchen sink (and not a floor above), he could create an auxiliary vent in the wall going up to at least 6" above the flood level of the washing machine, use a vent 90 to run it over to meet the washing machine's vent, and tie in with an upside down sanitary tee (so airflow is directed upward).

The washing machine's waste line behind the sink can come down to a wye and then have a horizontal (but sloped downward) run perpendicular to the sink's S-trap and then tie in to wherever the sink's S-trap is going with another wye.

If the washing machine doesn't have it's own vent, it might be too much for the AAV. I could be wrong, but last time I looked at an AAV it had a DFU capacity of 12. The DFU of a high capacity washer can be around 9 (to find dfu find the gallons per minute- GPM- and multiply it by 1.5) for a 6gpm washer. Add in the DFU for the sink and the dishwasher, and it may overtax the AAV. Not to mention the force of the washing machine can create suction that might ruin the AAV's diaphragm.

It's really hard to tell without being able to see where the pipes are though.

I drew a rough sketch of the washing machine standpipe that includes code min/max limits.



Also, to avoid having to run the pipe down through the cabinet but still have the AAV, you can use a kit like this (but in ABS instead of PVC)


This is assuming that the washing machine ties in to a vent and that the soil pipe runs from right to left underneath. But this is a general idea of how to tie things together. c/o is a 2" cleanout & would be accessible via an access panel in the wall. The wye sweep would be going in the direction of the waste flow.
 

Last edited by ZanneJ; 12-15-17 at 10:40 PM. Reason: added sketch
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