closet flange on toilet broken

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  #1  
Old 05-10-01, 03:59 PM
jkpearson
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The wax ring on my toilet allowed a leak that has necessitated replacing the hardwood floor in my 1/2 bath.

After removing the toilet & the old floor, I noticed that the CLOSET FLANGE is broken & not usable. The pipe coming from the sewer system is in the cement slab.

Question(s): Since I am sure that the flange is glued to the pipe in the slab, should I cut it off & try to chip the extra pieces with a chisel & hammer before replacing it? Has anyone accomplished this successfully? Or are there any good ideas out there? Do they make a kit to replace a broken closet flange?

FYI (With the old hardwood floor & plywood base out, I have about 2 inches to work with before I replace the flooring).

Many thanks....
 
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Old 05-10-01, 04:21 PM
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They make a little gadget called a "flange spanner". It's a replacement for the broken out section that slips under the lip of the existing flange (I assume that it's broken out at the bolt keyway). They are cheap, and if the flange is otherwise intact, then you're back in business without the aid of a jack hammer.
 
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Old 05-10-01, 04:22 PM
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I would just use a Fernco Coupling

to attach the new closet flange to the old pipe.
 
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Old 05-10-01, 04:26 PM
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I would just use a Fernco Coupling

to attach the new closet flange to the old pipe.

And here is a closet Flange Spanner, if RonFL is right about your situation.

 
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Old 05-10-01, 04:32 PM
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Nice thought, but he's apparantly dealing with pvc concreted into a slab (a common situation here in N. FL), and only has a couple of inches before replacing the dress flooring. If it's a typical pvc flange, that means that the bottom the glue neck is at most an inch or less above the concrete. The ideal _would_ be to chip out enough concrete to get the new flange in, but that's a beast of a job for most homeowners.
 
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Old 05-10-01, 08:55 PM
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There is a simple solution to this problem, I have talked about this once before.

There a a tool called a rambit looks like this and comes in many sizes up to 4".

The tool will remove pipe glued into a fitting hub as seen in this picture.

This tool will remove all the existing pipe out of the hub of the fitting as seen here.

This tool will save you the hassels of doing it the hard way, if you have never tried this tool then your really missing a product that speaks for it's self.
 
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Old 05-10-01, 09:21 PM
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Thanks Ron, for the education. I had not seen a Rambit, but sure coulda used one a month or so ago.

Rick
 
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Old 05-10-01, 09:32 PM
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No problem, contractors love it when they here they don't have to open a wall up do to a broken plastic pipe, in order to fix it.

Most are shocked that there was such a tool.


It has helped me out a time or two, for instance, was installing a pedistal sink, the stub out was too much, even if I was to cut it back as close as possible.

The rambit allowed me to remove the existing pipe and use a male trap adaptor, which gave be the space needed to allow the back of the sink to set against the wall.

It's a spendy tool but it's worth it's weight in gold.
 
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Old 05-12-01, 04:26 PM
mojo
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closet flange repair

what i usually do is cut off the top of the flange with a sawz-all, ( flush with the floor ), then glue a new flange, the type that goes into pipe, not over it. i figured this out after chiseling off a few. also, wouldnt this type of flange be easier to remove if it ever breaks, than the glue-over type?
mojo
 
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Old 05-12-01, 05:29 PM
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What ever works for you, I was just letting everyone know there is another way, and very simple solution for a broken closet flange or broken plastic nipple.

With the Rambit you won't have to worry that you might crack the pipe or fitting if your doing the hammer and chisel routine, the Rambit will do a clean removal.
 
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