Need advice on how to connect toilet flange


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Old 02-26-18, 11:48 AM
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Need advice on how to connect toilet flange

Hello everyone,

Can anyone help? I just had a toilet start leaking around the base, removed it and realized that there's nothing left for the flange to be bolted to, just a drain pipe. The prior 4" flange (plastic) was extremely loose, causing the issue. Some wood has rotted out on either side, I'd prefer not to have to rip up the whole floor unless absolutely necessary. Any workable temporary solution is fine by me.

There's no obvious place for me to bolt the flange, just the cast metal drain pipe sticking straight upwards. It's about 4 inches from the opening.

Here's a photo.

If I add a cast iron closet flange will I be able to bolt the toilet to that alone securely?

If anyone has advice, I'm all ears.
 
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Old 02-26-18, 03:17 PM
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If the wood is rotted, you need to replace the floor. It must have been leaking for awhile is the wood is rotted away. No cannot just bolt the toilet to the flange. The flange must be anchored to a solid floor. I would also check the condition of the floor joist supporting the floor.
 
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Old 02-26-18, 07:46 PM
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You can get a cast iron repair flange. It basically goes into the iron pipe and uses a rubber gasket to make the connection.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001D9QN8A

But as Norm mentioned, regardless what flange you get, it needs to be bolted/screwed to the floor and joists. The pipe itself won't support the toilet and you'll end up breaking the iron pipe or cracking the joint to the stack.

Can you access the ceiling below with just some drywall work? If so, you could cut a hole and add some 2x4 or 2x6 bracing around the bend, attached to the floor/ceiling joists to screw your new flange to. Some drywall repair might be easier than re-tiling the floor.
 
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Old 02-26-18, 08:01 PM
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That looks like oriented strand sub-flooring. Basically wood chips pressed together with glue. If that's what you have it looses most all of it's integrity and strength when it gets wet.
 
 

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