Do i need a shut off valve at fixture?

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Old 03-04-18, 06:38 PM
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Do i need a shut off valve at fixture?

I am now looking at installing a Manabloc manifold and seperate lines to each fixture. Since i have a shut off at the beginning of each run at the Manabloc do i need one coming out of the wall at the fixture?

skeeter
 
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Old 03-04-18, 06:52 PM
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Do i need a shut off valve at fixture?
I don't know..... do you ?

If you're servicing the toilet or bathroom faucet.... are you going to keep running back and forth?
 
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Old 03-04-18, 07:12 PM
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No, i have a son to do the running. LOL
 
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Old 03-04-18, 07:30 PM
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I know it's the in thing to install a manifold, but I just hate them for several reasons.
The cost of the manifold.
Going to use far more piping. (added cost and time)
Reduced flow.
Yes I would install a shut off at each fixture no matter how you run the lines.
 
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Old 03-04-18, 08:24 PM
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I have always hated those valves at the fixture. By the time you need to use it, anywhere between 5 and 20 years since it was installed, it won't shut off, stuck shut or leaks around the shaft when you try to shut it off. What good is it really. Is it required by code?

skeeter
 
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Old 03-04-18, 09:18 PM
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From what I've researched.... by code.... valves are not required at each device if served by a manifold but every connection/valve at the manifold must be clearly labeled.
 
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Old 03-04-18, 09:35 PM
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You'll have to check your local area for code. One reason I can think of is that most people know about a shutoff valve when it's installed at the fixture. I mean...the avg person who at least has a bit of a clue. Most won't know about manifolds and such.

If a supply hose fails or a toilet fails somehow and just fills and fills, it's easy to say...look for the chrome valve sticking out of the wall and turn it CCW to stop the water. Also, much easier to reach down, turn off water, replace flapper (fill valve, cartridge, washer, etc) turn on water....than to either go downstairs and do it your self or MAYBE have someone else to run do it, forget which valve, be playing on their phone, not hear you yell, not be there at all when you want to do the work, etc. I've never had an issue with the 1/4 turn ball valves leaking or freezing after non use, but you could also just go around every year (like each Christmas or New Years) and cycle them. Make it a family event... "The Skeeter Family Xmas Valve Cycling!", joy and fun for everyone!Seriously, you can get them in any finish you like, with different handle styles if you want fancy where they're visible, and you have to connect the supply lines to something. Why not a shiny fancy valve?
 
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Old 03-05-18, 08:44 AM
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I agree, code-wise, you need a shutoff for each fixture. The shutoff can be at the fixture or in the basement or wherever. A manifold counts as that shutoff.

I personally like the shutoff at each fixture. Toilets tend to overflow when you least expect it and it's nice to be able to turn it off right there. I always buy the 1/4 turn valves, which I think are much more reliable and longer lasting than the multi-turn valves.
 
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Old 03-06-18, 07:33 AM
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CW not CCW. At the fixture can save headaches in the future.

Of course gunguy45 meant CW to shut off. For the minimal additional cost, a shutoff at the fixture is more than a convenience. Who wants to run down to basement when water, or the overflow from a clogged toilet is running out onto the floor.
 
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