Sizing a Pressure reducing valve


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Old 03-29-18, 02:01 PM
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Sizing a Pressure reducing valve

My water pressure fluctuates between 75 and 95psi in about 15 seconds during the day. No water running in the house. You can hear the water heater popping as it expands and contracts. I'm tired of worrying about something breaking, so have decided to install a PRV.
My incoming water line is 3/4 copper and I am looking at a Cash Acme EB-25 that has sharkbite connectors on each end. Since that is the size of the sharkbites, I assume that would be the correct one. There are two of us living in a 2000 sqft house. Your opinions please before I buy it. The only negative I see is the price of the repair cartridge.
 
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Old 03-29-18, 02:44 PM
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I'm a painter not a plumber but I always bought the same size PRV as the pipe it would connect to. Have you tried adjusting yours any?
 
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Old 03-29-18, 04:35 PM
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I was thinking that you are in the market for a Pressure Relief Valve (PRV) ; but your pressures seem to already be well in excess of the household pressures that they are intended to control.
 
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Old 03-29-18, 05:32 PM
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PRV's can withstand fairly high incoming water pressures. The EB-25 the OP is looking at is rated for 300psi maximum input. Looks like a pretty good valve. I agree the cartridge is a little pricey but I doubt it's going to need routine replacement.

cash acme/wp-content/uploads//EB25_Spec_2014.pdf
 
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Old 04-02-18, 10:35 AM
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Any standard PRV will work for you.

While you're at it, get yourself a pressure gauge and consider adding a hose connection there to attach the pressure gauge - so everything is in one place to set and test the PRV.

You'll likely also need a small expansion tank. As water is heated, it will expand, and would increase your piping pressure without the addition of a tank.

Good idea though with those high pressure readings.
 
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Old 05-18-18, 06:50 AM
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Finally installed the pressure regulator valve, works great! I did have to install a expansion tank as recommended. Biggest problem was the incoming line from the street was directly behind the water heater, so I had to unhook that and route the lines over a couple of feet. Thanks for your help
 
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Old 05-20-18, 04:28 PM
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Glad to hear it worked out! Projects always seem to end up more complicated than initially planned, but great that you figured it out!
 
 

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