Help identify pipe

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Old 04-26-18, 11:23 AM
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Help identify pipe

Can anyone tell me what this pipe would be for? This in on the ceiling in my basement and seems to be leaking water down on occasion. I'm assuming when raining but can't be sure. Just thought I would get some ideas before calling someone out to look at it. I provided pictures.

Thanks,
 
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Old 04-26-18, 11:31 AM
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If this is in the basement ceiling, how about giving us a clue what is directly above it on the first floor?
 
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Old 04-26-18, 11:33 AM
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My master bathroom is above there which includes a toilet, sit in tub and a separate shower.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 11:36 AM
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It might be a vent line that got cut. I would glue a cap or a cleanout onto it.

Is there any plumbing nearby in the basement below? Someone might have eliminated or relocated the basement bathroom.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 11:46 AM
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Any idea of why it would be leaking from inside the pipe? It's not a lot but I can definitely see some water stains coming down the insulation that is on the basement wall.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 11:50 AM
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The vent pipes are open on the roof and if it rains, water gets into the vent pipe... that water is supposed to eventually go down the drain. So if that is a vent pipe, any water in it would ordinarily be heading for a drain. Instead it drains onto your ceiling.

It could also be condensation during winter months... cold air coming down the pipe hitting warm moist air.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 11:53 AM
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Ok, thanks for the information. Do you think it's possible to tie that vent pipe to the drain pipe that is running perpindecular in the photo I posted.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 11:57 AM
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Hard to tell. But probably.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 12:01 PM
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Now that I think about it I have a rough in bathroom in the basement. I assume this was going to be the tie in for the vent if a bathroom was ever installed downstairs.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 12:03 PM
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That's what I was alluding to in post #4.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 12:12 PM
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If you cap the pipe at the bottom it will slowly fill with water over time. You could cap it on the roof to prevent water from entering in the first place. Just make sure you cap the correct pipe as you likely have at least one or more other vents sticking out of your roof.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 12:40 PM
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I would not cap the roof vent, as its quite likely that pipe is in use by other fixtures.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 01:14 PM
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No need to cap it, but you could put 2-90 degree fittings on the roof to prevent water getting in. No glue, needed normally. I did that at my old house...more to lessen venturi effect from the crazy winds we get than for rain.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 06:36 PM
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I wonder if that is a PVC sleeve for future wiring access. Temperature change is causing condensation.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 06:45 PM
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Before you start capping, I would figure out a way to confirm where the water is coming from. Whether it's coming from inside the pipe or outside. Then you can figure out the best course of action to fix it.

If it were me, I'd temporarily cap it with a rubber cap. Leave it for the next storm and see how it does. then open it up with a bucket underneath.
 
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Old 04-26-18, 06:49 PM
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Or put a bucket underneath, get on the roof and pour a gallon of water down the vent pipe.
 
 

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