"Open drain pipe" -- legit or no?


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Old 08-11-18, 09:22 AM
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Question "Open drain pipe" -- legit or no?

The previous owner did a real hack job (see pics). There is an open 2" PVC pipe which has 3x 1/2+ tubes running into it.
  • the white tube is the drain tube from the dishwasher (which is 20+ feet away, and upstairs) --is this legit for a dishwasher drain line
  • the other two lines are from the water filters for backwashing purposes (one is not in use)

Is this open drain "correct" It seems wrong to me. I assume there should be a closed pipe with a nipple-type connection for the smaller diameter tubing.

I'll be putting drywall up here so I want to make sure it's not completely unsafe or wrong before doing so.

Note that this is not a load bearing wall!

Thanks!





 
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Old 08-11-18, 10:37 AM
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For the water filter drains that is acceptable, I'm not sure about dishwasher but somebody will comment.

I would not enclose that in a wall, move it to the interior side of the drywall as well as the pipes that feed it!
 
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Old 08-11-18, 11:14 AM
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Itís a bit of a hack job but itís fine what you need it to do. The open pipe is protected by a P-trap which keeps sewer gas from filling your home. The gases should be your main concern. The other concern would be if the drains ever back up it will flow right out of that open pipe.
 
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Old 08-11-18, 11:47 AM
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Those are exactly my two concerns (gases and backflow). We have a septic system, not sure if that makes a difference. Would it be "wrong" of me to cap the pipe and thread in 3 nipples (or similar)? I guess if backflow happens, it'll come out the basement toilet/sink/shower regardless. Those are all technically the same "open pipe"...
 
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Old 08-12-18, 12:29 AM
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If that p-trap gets clogged, your wall cavity will fill with sewage.
 
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Old 08-12-18, 08:57 AM
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I think by code you have to have an air gap on a drain hose from a water softener or water filter or any other water treatment equipment connected to your potable water system. Iím pretty sure thatís for sanitation purposes (I attached my Acid Neutralize Filter drain line to an air gap device connected to my floor drain). They make them for standpipes, like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Water-Softene...K2DJ7HA9DTM5XZ

I think you also need an air gap somewhere on your dishwasher drain. If that hose in your pic comes directly from the dishwasher drain outlet, without an air gap, I think thatís not right also.

So I donít see how you can make those connections liquid tight as I think you are contemplating. But Iím not 100% sure.
 
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Old 08-13-18, 04:28 AM
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Thanks Steve -- I think I'd rather the bathroom floor be the target of a backup rather than a wall cavity!
 
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Old 08-13-18, 04:33 AM
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zoesdad -- thanks for the info and link, that helps!
 
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Old 08-13-18, 12:43 PM
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I would try to eliminate/correct that piping. The DW should drain into the garbage disposal (there's a plugged inlet in the disposal for it) or, if there isn't a disposal, the kitchen sink drain via a branch tailpiece. I'm not sure what to say about filter backwash. Perhaps replacing the laundry box with a small utility sink? A sink could use the 1Ĺ" drain -- a laundry box ought to be 2" and the standpipe a bit longer.

Also note that the p-trap isn't a glue trap and the sanitary tee is backwards. No disrespect intended, but I would have to say that it's pretty far from 'legit'.
 
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Old 08-13-18, 01:16 PM
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We have a septic system and therefore (as recommended) do not have a garage disposal. I understand that's the "normal" way to do it, the previous owner decided to run this 5/8" tubing halfway through the basement ceiling instead.

We have a utility sink and a washer inlet/outlet box. I'm going to get a standpipe air-gap for these 2-3 tubes and use that in the laundry standpipe so that the pipe can be capped inside the wall and things should then be "almost to code".

Yeah, I didn't plumb any of this, so no disrespect at all -- I appreciate the insight. I will take a look at the tee and look up what a "glue trap" is. :-D

A lot of DIY here I've noticied is not completely correct. I'm fixing it as I find it.
 
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Old 08-13-18, 09:53 PM
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Here's a branch tailpiece for a dishwasher, also available as an extension. You would loop the dishwasher drain as high as possible inside the cabinet, then hose-clamp to the side inlet. You may need a DW drain adapter to go from 5/8" to 3/4".

Or if you have an unused hole in the sink, could install an air gap. Then run the DW drain to the air gap, and down to the branch (5/8" tubing to the air gap and 3/4" tubing to the branch).

A glue trap is a trap that is glued on both sides. Yours has a slip joint in it and should remain accessible. Slip joint nuts can occasionally break.

 
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Old 08-14-18, 06:03 AM
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I see what you mean, thanks for the info. DW and sink are not next to each other, I'd have to run under the floor and then through joists (removing drywall) to get to the sink. That might be a project for another day.
 
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Old 08-14-18, 07:19 PM
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That's unusual but not unheard of. How many cabinets in between, and are they connected? If it's only one or two, you might be able to drill a few holes, high up where they don't interfere with anything.
 
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Old 08-15-18, 03:42 AM
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Mine runs the way Steve Gro describes- works fine. Steve
 
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Old 08-15-18, 06:44 AM
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They are not on the same wall or connected by cabinets. I'd have to go under the floor or over the ceiling (attic). hence, I think I'll just leave it as is for now.
 
 

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