Connecting T join to 40mm metal pipe.


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Old 10-27-18, 01:30 AM
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Connecting T join to 40mm metal pipe.

Hello guys . So i recently started to renovate second floor in my house. I got to a point now where i need to run some central heating pipes to second floor (before it was all electric heating second floor ,first floor is heated with oil burner ) i need to connect them to my existing heating pipes need your advice how and what would be the best option in my case ..i will try to upload some pictures . And soory for my bad English. Edit here is some picture.

Moderator note: Member is from Denmark
 

Last edited by PJmax; 10-27-18 at 03:47 PM.
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Old 10-27-18, 01:57 AM
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How to add pictures. May not work from some phones.
 
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Old 10-27-18, 05:48 AM
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Thumbs up Welcome to our forums!

Before you post further you need to update your profile to tell us in what region you live in.

You need to plan this carefully because you can not necessarily just tap into ductwork, extend the pipes and expect it to work.
It will take a far bit of air volume and pressure to a second floor and it it could be possible your furnace may not be able to handle it.
You would do well to leave the baseboard heaters in place before you commit to forced air heating on the upper floor.


Pics, a sketch of exactly how and where you intend to tap into ductwork and details on your furnace and it's fan would help.
 
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Old 10-27-18, 03:51 PM
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40mm = 1.5" so it sounds like the member has a boiler system in place.

Like Greg mentioned..... you can't just cut in to a system like that where it's convenient.
It must be logically planned so that both floors heat evenly and correctly.

Typically..... the second floor piping would be brought to the boiler location and tied in there.
It may be wise to have a local plumber stop in and give you some help.
 
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Old 10-28-18, 04:56 AM
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Thanx Pete.....my mistake.

I assumed air but the same idea applies to hydronic heating.
You still need to plan this carefully.

Like I originally suggested, a more clear pic of what you are doing would help.
You need to be aware that you could have considerably different heating requirements on the second floor than below it.
Unless you create an independent zone for the second floor it could either get too cold or too hot depending on how much heat is required wherever the thermostat is located.
 
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Old 10-29-18, 12:38 AM
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Thanks for replaying guys .I will try to post some pictures today its just in planing to upgrade soon to new heathing system because this one is old oil burner from 1980 .
 
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Old 10-29-18, 05:14 AM
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In CDN $$$ how much is electricity/kwh and oil/litre.
Presumably where you are oil must be less expensive.

If only in planning stages you would do well to attempt to put the second floor on a separate zone.
Because your baseboard heating is already independent of the boiler you may not be happy with the temperature control with upstairs being on a single zone.
 
 

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